Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower

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An Emma Watson “Our Shared Shelf” Selection for November/December 2018 NAMED A BEST BOOK OF 2018/ MENTIONED BY: The New York Public Library Mashable • The Atlantic Bustle The Root • Politico Magazine (“What the 2020 Candidates Are Reading This Summer”) NPR Fast Company (“10 Best Books for Battling Your Sexist Workplace”) • The Guardian (“Top 10 Books About Angry Women”)

Rebecca Solnit, The New Republic: “Funny, wrenching, pithy, and pointed.”

Roxane Gay: “I encourage you to check out Eloquent Rage out now.”

Joy Reid, Cosmopolitan: “A dissertation on black women’s pain and possibility.”

America Ferrera: “Razor sharp and hilarious. There is so much about her analysis that I relate to and grapple with on a daily basis as a Latina feminist.”

Damon Young: “Like watching the world’s best Baptist preacher but with sermons about intersectionality and Beyoncé instead of Ecclesiastes.”

Melissa Harris Perry: “I was waiting for an author who wouldn’t forget, ignore, or erase us black girls…I was waiting and she has come in Brittney Cooper.”

Michael Eric Dyson: Cooper may be the boldest young feminist writing today…and she will make you laugh out loud.”

So what if it’s true that Black women are mad as hell? They have the right to be. In the Black feminist tradition of Audre Lorde, Brittney Cooper reminds us that anger is a powerful source of energy that can give us the strength to keep on fighting.

Far too often, Black women’s anger has been caricatured into an ugly and destructive force that threatens the civility and social fabric of American democracy. But Cooper shows us that there is more to the story than that. Black women’s eloquent rage is what makes Serena Williams such a powerful tennis player. It’s what makes Beyoncé’s girl power anthems resonate so hard. It’s what makes Michelle Obama an icon.

Eloquent rage keeps us all honest and accountable. It reminds women that they don’t have to settle for less. When Cooper learned of her grandmother’s eloquent rage about love, sex, and marriage in an epic and hilarious front-porch confrontation, her life was changed. And it took another intervention, this time staged by one of her homegirls, to turn Brittney into the fierce feminist she is today. In Brittney Cooper’s world, neither mean girls nor fuckboys ever win. But homegirls emerge as heroes. This book argues that ultimately feminism, friendship, and faith in one’s own superpowers are all we really need to turn things right side up again.

A BEST/MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK OF 2018 BY: Glamour Chicago Reader • Bustle • Autostraddle

Specification: Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower

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89 reviews for Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower

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  1. Sejin Keem

    I read this book to learn more about intersectional feminism. Brittney Cooper has taught me about what it’s like to live as a black women in the United States. Strongly recommend to ANYBODY.

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  2. missgurl501

    As a doctoral candidate I had to finish this book before starting my research because there is so much I have to do when I begin the work in my community. The depth and perspective written here? YES!!!As my Grandma used to say, “If you can’t say ouch, say AMEN!” I have “Amen!” highlighted all throughout this book and will be referring to it to remind myself why the work is necessary.

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  3. M. H. Lange

    Easily one of the best books I’ve ever read. I know I will return to it many times over the course of my life. While reading it, I felt as though I had long been thirsting for these words. I’m so grateful to Dr. Cooper for this gift.

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  4. Katharine W

    This is my first time doing an amazon review but I had to stop mid-read because this book is EVERYTHING. More people should be reading this book and talking about it because it is such a beautiful and insightful book about feminism. I read a lot of books about feminism and sometimes they blend together but this one has a completely different aspect to it. I can’t recommend this book enough.

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  5. Brean’a

    I loved this book!!! This book creates connections between historical experiences for Black women,systemic oppression, and various daily challenges clear. Dr. Coopers use of personal narratives, reflection on challenges, vulnerability and knowledge made this book thought provoking, tear jerking, and a wonderful way to understand the complex life implications on living at the margins. Definite must-read. Invest in this book, it is amazing

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  6. Amazon Customer

    A very powerful read and a must-read to understand what difficulties Black communities and Black women in particular have to go through to “make it” in the world that is so skewed against them. My eyes have been opened to so many new realities Black women have to deal with, I can’t even… This book hit me right in the feels. Read it. Seriously, just read it.

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  7. G.

    This book is a life quencher for minorities struggling to make it through white-centric PhD programs. Necessary read for white students (and non-students alike) to understand what this journey is like.Thank you for writing this.

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  8. Selamawit M. Washington

    This is a truth! A must read for EVERYONE. Beautiful writing, triggers refreshing intellectual thought. Might make you hurl the book at your husband, or slip it under your pillow for comfort. Will be using this as a part of my curriculum. The most important writing of my lifetime.

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  9. porsha williams gates

    I would recommend this book to every single woman. Black women (cis and trans), this is for us. All other women: you’ll learn something, as there are gems for you, too. Cooper’s words are thoughtful and compelling. She will have you saying “amen”, “mmmhmm”, “daaaaamnnn”, and “yasssssss”. Thank you, Dr. Cooper.

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  10. Nikki T

    Read this book for my black feminist theory class. Right from the beginnjng, I knew that I was going to learn a some lessons in life from this poignant and well written book by a very intelligent black woman

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  11. A. Taylor

    An enlightening read that will no doubt leave you enraged but informed enough to fight. Ten out of ten, highly recommended.

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  12. Edith

    This book challenged my thinking. Started a little slow but I’m so glad I didn’t stop reading. If radical thinking offends you this book may rattle you cage.

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  13. Virginia Wiles

    Should be required reading for everyone, but especially anyone who calls themselves “feminist”, White, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, whomever. And for those who resist the label, READ THIS BOOK! Seriously. A well-written memoir in the voice of critical honesty. Humor, perplexity, hunger for Justice (and Shalom), wonderful, vivid, powerful storytelling. Functional, world-changing art.

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  14. Sabrini Green

    The writing, the personal connections, the rage. I’m so glad I purchased this book. If you were ever feeling lost, like myself, this book will give you new purpose.

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  15. ShariD

    This is a great book. Would highly recommend for a variety of audiences. She is an amazing author who keeps you intrigued, interested and engaged throughout the whole book.

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  16. Judy Shack

    Absolutely loved this book … she’s direct, honest and deeply introspective. Yet, Brittney Cooper also clearly lays out the systemic causes of racism and challenges us all to step up and fight for change. Everyone should read this book now!

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  17. tasha

    This is the first book I’ve read in entirety in Black feminism. I have never been interested in feminism as a topic or philosophy. This book and its author’s humor allowed me to think differently about current political affairs and process experiences that I never quite had the vocabulary to speak truth to situations I’ve experienced. I am new to Ms Coopers work and am looking forward to following her work.

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  18. DPT (nutrition minor)

    Thought provoking. I was able to both identify with some of the authors experiences and feel enraged at what Black people have suffered for doing everyday things I have done myself.

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  19. seprah

    My God!This book has changed the way i view my own personal journey into feminism.Definitely a must read.

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  20. Ruth Ann Harnisch

    The longer I live the more layers of privilege I uncover, and I thank @ProfessorCrunk for graciously offering lessons for many years. (Have you seen her @TEDTalks from #TEDWomen?)This book gives me a chance to put money in her pocket by buying it and telling you to buy it. She should be richly rewarded for her scholarship and for making it accessible.Rage is a superpower indeed and I am glad the author has chosen to deploy hers in this way.

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  21. Linda M.

    Although focusing specifically on Black feminism as a way of engaging a specific community of people, this book and Dr. Cooper’s journey speaks to many of the rest of us.

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  22. James Hamer

    A great read for anyone!!

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  23. ReGina Newkirk

    There are so many strong aspects about this book – where do I begin? Cooper addresses the intersectionality of being black and female with a boldness and directness rarely seen. She also calls some groups and institutions out as well. From the black church restricting our embracing the sexual beings we are to white feminists choosing race over gender, Cooper delivers her messages with a wallop, knocking your head and really making you think. Excellent, excellent read.

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  24. Aubrey Petty

    I absolutely loved this book. The chapter White Women’s Tears should be required reading. I saw Dr. Cooper at an event and she is just as wonderful in person. Highly recommended!

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  25. Caitlin

    Dr. Cooper is real, she is honest, and truthful. Listening to her wisdom and her history was an honor and a privilege I’ll never be able to repay. Books like this show the importance of listening and elevating Black, Feminist voices, as they have so much to offer our society, our communities, and our futures.

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  26. Alexandria C

    I was reading this book to understand my own rage and the feeling of I am not alone and the understanding behind some of my anger that I couldn’t put into words has helped me immensely. Dr cooper gives you the words you have been searching for to dissect the anger black women have had since childhood.The kind of stuff you see happening but can’t figure out why it bothers you and then wonder so long that you think it’s just you. As a woman who grew up in a white school and made it I struggle with my blackness and this book helped put a lot into perspective

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  27. Cy Grant

    I love this book and the way she put my thoughts into perspective. I highly recommend for anyone wanting to know more about black feminism and how it applies to our current society.

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  28. Amnoni

    Just bought this book and I am super excited to read it as I am navigating what it means to have eloquent rage in a society that does not always see my humanity. Really pumped about learning and growing from this read!

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  29. Keturah Kendrick

    The level of analysis of the structures that weigh down black women (as a demographic) is so high, I found myself awed at how rock solid her case is for why we all should own our rage. She does not mince words or try to make the data, research and her anecdotal evidence comfort black men and white people who believe themselves to be good. She weaves feminist theology in with honest assessments for the realities of overachieving black girls who can not be fully convinced that their silence and submission will save them. This book has me speechless hours after finishing it.

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  30. Michael J Nilon

    This is an essential resource for understanding intersectionality. It explains how blackness trumps womanhood and keeps the voices of black women marginalized vis-à-vis black men. For someone like me, a white man, it provides an entry point to seeing the anger of black women as a call to love and respect them and other black persons and their experience.

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  31. R. Christensen

    As a 40 yo white lady on a quest of continuous improvement, and as someone striving for social justice, this book opened my eyes to so much. Thank you, Dr. Cooper. 10/10 will read again.

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  32. Divamom40

    One of my if not the best read for 2020. I also have it on audible.

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  33. Ms B

    This book is a great read. The author explains feminism, racism, sexism and the experiences of black people in America. The role that politics, laws and legislation has played in systematic racism for people of color primarily black people. For those that want a deeper understanding of these topics and how we can coexist together as people in a safer and healthier way this book is for you.

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  34. amanda

    This is the best book that I have read in years. I have followed Dr. Cooper since I first saw her on the MHP show and this book is absolutely fantastic. Dr. Cooper perfectly breaks down Black feminism in a way that is accessible and relevant in this day and age. I could not put this book down because as a Black woman from the south in academia I related so much to what she wrote and she did a beautiful job of weaving in theory with personal and modern day applications. I definitely plan on buying this book for my girls this Christmas! This is a must read!

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  35. Joyce

    Cooper is a professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and Africana Studies at Rutgers University and has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other media. She tells the feminist story from her experience as a Black woman growing up poor in the south. In her opening chapter she says, “In this book I am doing what Black women do best. I’m calling America out on her bullshit about racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, and a bunch of other stuff.” She notes (quoting Audre Lorde) that, “Rage is a legitimate political emotion. Focused with precision, it can become a powerful source of energy serving progress and change.” She speaks to many issues with unapologetic honesty. It is generally understood that the oppressed are the ones who know more clearly what is going on in the dynamic of oppression; and in sexism and racism, Black women are the oppressed of the oppressed. Cooper, however, does not see herself as a “feminist killjoy.” She notes that the clarity that comes from rage tells us what we want to be rid of and also what kind of world we want; so we need to help people find better tools to work with. A Christian, Cooper ends her book like all good church services with a Benediction, the last part of which is: “May your rage be a force for good.”

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  36. BreAnna

    “Eloquent rage isn’t always loud, but it is always effective.””Today, most rapes are intraracial, but white women’s perceived vulnerability to crimes at the hands of Black men foes untold amounts of harm to Black communities and, in particular, to Black women and children.””Following the rules shouldn’t be the guarantor of rights or dignity.”This is a great read for anyone but her discussion of how her race intersects with her sex to impact her life and her experiences is something that any white feminist could learn from. I highly recommend this to everyone!

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  37. W.R.N.W

    Love, love this book. It’s been weeks since I’ve read it and I’m still reciting parts in my head. Cooper came strong; she preached in only a way a Black Feminist can. This book is dense with sharp and insightful social criticisms. Strongly recommended.

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  38. Eva

    A MUST READ! Cruel reality of the life we live in today! Once you start reading you won’t want to put it down.

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  39. Janelle Butler

    This book is like chicken soup for a black girl’s soul. I bought it on kindle but I’m going to also buy a paper copy. It’s something I could read over and over again as I progress through life and need an emotional cleansing. 100% recommend it.

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  40. Dr. Marc Muneal

    Eloquent Rage is about constructive discomfort. In an accessible voice that, nevertheless, refuses to sugarcoat or trivialize some of the most pressing issues facing us, Brittney Cooper uses her personal and intellectual history to teach, entertain, and anger the reader productively.As an example, one chapter juxtaposes a personal struggle of Cooper’s against Sandra Bland’s tragic and unjust demise against a history of violence directed at marginalized communities and black women in particular. In this chapter and others, Eloquent Rage shows us how we might see our lives in the contexts of our world and, most importantly, process what we see and decide where we go next.

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  41. Megan Elizabeth

    Get this book- Now. You will not regret it. Brittney Cooper has a beautiful or should I say Eloquent way of explaining the struggles that people of color, particular women go through. I think that every white person should get a hold of this book, swallow a little of their pride, be ready for their privilege to be pointed out, and really get to know and understand why this book is important and why it needed to be written.

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  42. Mary Sicola

    Dear white women: Can we talk? Eloquent Rage is an important read. As a woman, some of it will resonate with you. As a white person, some of it will make you feel uncomfortable. Lean into the discomfort, consider this perspective, and I think you will learn from it as I did. This book is brutally honest, written with humor and grace, without straying from its intellectual underpinnings.

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  43. Nyala A. Dupree-Walker

    This book was the FIRST TIME I’ve felt HEARD SEEN and APPRECIATED as a Highly Educated Independent Single Black Woman pushing 40!!I saw it on screen in Gabrielle Union’s BET show Being Mary Jane! But I felt it in my soul that Brittany could relate to me in this book she touched on innumerable topics such as Perfectionism, Colorism,Sexuality, White women’s tears, and so many other things that affect me as I move through my life on a daily basis. This book was a warm cup of hot cocoa with a shot of bourbon! I felt like I was talking to a girlfriend and often Amened, Yes girled, and Got damn righted my way through this brilliant piece of literature!!I first heard of this book on the black girl podcast Getting Grown and needless to say it was life-affirming!! Also check out Girl, Woman Other!

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  44. DoveB

    This book made me laugh, cry, throw things, reflect, and appreciate more. I have found a new favorite writer and a story that deeply resonates with my experience. Thank you Dr Cooper!

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  45. Clevadiva

    This provided lots to think about. I enjoyed the opportunity to ponder on such injustices and how to make change in my piece of the world.

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  46. Professora

    If you want to read a work that critically engages Black women’s rage, this is it. Cooper’s text shows a beautiful mind at work, tackling issues, concerns, and plights, Black women and girls face. While not a difficult read, there is nothing simple about it. She has a way of taking a thing from the margins, dragging it to the center, no matter how painful or difficult, and capturing the very essence of it. This is what critical memoir is meant to do at its very best.

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  47. Kimberly G.

    What a gift! I just cannot put this book down. It is breathing life into so many thoughts and experiences that have defined my life, my relationships, and my research. I bought an additional copy for my mentor, and I am planning to buy more for my girlfriends! This book is so open and honest, presenting the multiple ways race, gender, and class converge in the oppression of Black women, and how we subsequently navigate the world. Truly a great and validating read!

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  48. Librarian64

    Haven’t completed the entire book yet but love what I’ve read so far. Must nibble and taste the nuances of every bite slowly to fully appreciate this morsel of a book. It speaks to me as a black woman and allows me to find my own voice in the story of someone who has found hers.

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  49. pastorbarb

    As a white woman pastor and author, I needed every ounce of courage within me to read this paradigm-shifting book. Unlearning my perceptions and beliefs (wrongly believing I am an amazing feminist) is now my daily work. Brittney Cooper’s Eloquent Rage benefits anyone who claims to love equality, equity, and justice for all. Her book will be my feminist Bible. The final chapter gave me permission to acknowledge my ignorance and go forth with purpose and joy.

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  50. Allegra

    Brittney has the most eloquent way of expressing her beautiful feminist rage. Thank you waking me up! This will be a book I pass on to all the people in my life

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  51. Hilda A

    Just an absolutely phenomenal book. I couldn’t put it down and I would not put it down for anything. So honestly refreshing and relatable on so many levels. Thank you so much Ms. Cooper for this insightful, intriguing masterpiece.

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  52. Rebecca L Nussbaum

    I loved this book, it is a brilliant read. Relatable, informative, and well put together. Thank you Brittney for writing this I learned so much and will share this with as many people as I can.

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  53. Jasmine

    I kept coming across this book while searching for something new to read but I didn’t know if I wanted to read it at first. I’m glad I made the decision to buy it because it is an absolute gem! It felt like someone answered my questions and mirrored the anger I’ve felt in various situations. This book was released at the perfect time and I think it’s something everyone should read at least once.

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  54. Amazon Customer

    Absolutely awesome. I love her intellectual and down to earth mash up and the way she challenges structural inequalities, white supremacy and patriarchy at every turn.

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  55. katarinaism

    It was actually the pod-cast episode “But that’s another story”, in which author and Professor Brittney Cooper spoke about religion, coming-of-age, and her love of the “Babysitters Club” that initially brought me here. In that episode (which I highly recommend), Cooper discussed growing up in a community where church was paramount, and asking questions was at best weakly tolerated, and at worst, blatantly discouraged. It took me back to my (very different) cultural upbringing, but a similar experience in my own catechism classes as a child asking questions about what a term or passage meant, and being either underwhelmed with the answer – or worse, ashamed at even having asked. Like Cooper, it took a long time to come to my own terms with what religion and spirituality meant to me. I had never heard this type of ambivalence and candidness in a discussion about religion before, and that podcast episode particularly resonated with me and eventually led me, here, to this book.Now on to the book: “Eloquent Rage” was phenomenal. Cooper somehow weaves the personal, the political, and everything in-between into a very readable and striking format. She uses rage as a tool to methodically and effectively call out injustice and fight for change. She holds no punches when pinpointing the social, political, economic and institutional forces that bolster racism and sexism. I learned a lot here, even as someone who (mistakenly) thought that they had been primed on feminism by taking women’s studies classes in college and digging into the required and suggested readings mentioned in the syllabus. However, though I had learned much about Gloria Steinem, Betty Friedan, and Susan B Anthony – I hadn’t heard of Ida B. Wells or Audre Lorde before this book despite their very prolific bibliographies and very clear contributions to the feminist movement. She uses this and many other points to illustrate how the contributions of Black women have been overlooked. To be honest, I also hadn’t heard the term “respectability politics”, though I was well aware of its contents (one of my parents being an immigrant from Asia). Cooper calls out respectability politics throughout the book, showing how it is used to rationalize injustice and only reinforce the existing patriarchy. This isn’t a dry textbook, and Cooper uses statistics sparingly, but the ones she uses are an effective and shocking indictment of the systems that be, illustrating the wide discrepancies of wealth based on race and sex.One passage that particularly stood out to me was the use of the term ‘resilience ‘and her very real explanation that term: ‘The logic of relying on people’s resilience goes something like, ‘Let’s see just how much we can take from you before you break. That is evil.” The use of this term as an excuse for idly allowing suffering and discrimination, is despicable. It also got me thinking about how the term ‘model minority’ plays into this logic – it’s a counterpart to the very faulty idea that personal traits can overcome structural problems. The idea of the underdog who breaks through boundaries and beats the odds to become something exceptional is a romanticized idea, forged in the old Western fables that accompanied the Gold Rush and the “rags-to-riches” novels that dominated the Gilded Age, but it is a fundamentally flawed and unfair expectation. By definition, exceptionalism is – well, exceptional. And, as Cooper notes, celebrating hard-earned success is distinct and separate from ignoring the barriers that stood in their way of getting there.This book left me, as another reviewer put it, ‘speechless’. It is brilliant, subversive, and honest and definitely the best (non-science) book I have read all year.

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  56. DrUnicorn

    just finished Eloquent Rage! THIS BOOK in every way speaks to the most profound and difficult discussions I’ve had with Black men, white men and women, and other Black women since I turned 18. Cooper captures so much in such a short text, but leaves with laughter and concepts for joy. I think this could be an amazing text for anyone wiling to change the way they see the world.

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  57. Ciara

    Cooper embodies the feelings of many southern black girls who grew up in the church only to leave home for higher education and get hit with a bunch of hardcore truths, facts and realizations that have been around her all along.I recommend this book to all black women and men. But I especially recommend this book to white men and women as well who may be interested in gaining understanding in how their compliance with or participation in white supremacist notions have affected black women.Amazing work.

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  58. MES

    I read this in the wake of Toni Morrison’s death. It’s a fitting tribute to Black feminism and educated thought.I felt *seen*, probably because many of the author’s experiences I shared as a smart and nerdy Black girl who was encouraged to excel, but didn’t know how to feel about blackness once I did. (I’m getting there.)Recommended.

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  59. Jolisa S. Collier-Lee

    I enjoyed it. It making reflect things on my own life. There are a lot of question i need to ask and answers.

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  60. Jamelia Shikany

    This book is one of the most honest books I’ve ever read. I found myself nodding along, sending quotes to my friends, and hoping that I carry these lessons with me always. Truly great read.

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  61. Teisha

    This book speaks to everything black women experience on a day to day. It truly captures the essence of how it is to exist in this world.

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  62. Tiffany

    Brilliantly weaves together narratives, history, politics, popular culture, and truth. This book affirmed and saved my existence. Will read over and over.

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  63. Meta Fouric

    I always questioned whether Feminism really stood for the liberation and equality of every human being, because it was taught by/about/for white women. Brittany spells out how Black women have BEEN the embodiment of feminism since the beginning of time in these United States. I am much better able to continue my education with open eyes after focusing my lens on that fact.

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  64. Brittany Ryan

    This, more than any other book, gave me a very current and pragmatic understanding of what it means to be a woman today. The way Cooper breaks down her personal struggles within the context of racial politics helped me understand my own guilt and gave me practical tools for channeling my emotions into productive action. This book posits the strongest type of feminism, a loving feminism that puts gender before race. It’s prereq for any white woman that wants to win the fight and take all her sisters with her.

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  65. Shellie

    Love Brittney and this book. There are a couple of issues that I have an opposing opinion about, but I appreciate her perspective. Keep on doing what you do Brittney and I will continue to cheer you and your eloquent voice.

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  66. CharlieCharlie

    This is a must have for Black women who understands what it feels like not to be heard and have your rage misidentified! I literally feel like I am reading the pages of my own journey and it reassuring to know that I’m (we’re) not alone. Cooper loves us so deeply and passionately and in a world that hardly ever looks to affirms us, I am grateful that this work was created

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  67. PJLO

    Yaaaaas! Brittney Cooper helps us put our rage to good use. I needed a language to help me express this mix of anger, hope, and deep faith. This book is it. Every.single.person should read this book.

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  68. Ladybugluv

    Bought this book on a whim during a one week break from nursing school. It’s been a few years since I have read a book I connected with this much.

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  69. Caroline Murphy

    Eloquent Rage is an essay collection that centers Black feminism and Black women. Cooper writes about a wide range of cultural, personal, and political topics including respectability politics, neoliberalism, and the myth of exceptionalism. Cooper’s writing is sharp and incisive. It will make you reflect and reconsider long-held assumptions and biases. What I particularly appreciated in her collection is how Cooper encourages us to celebrate and harness rage and anger as a way to fight against oppression, and how she weaves in anecdotes about her own experience.This is an excellent collection of essays about intersectional feminism. There are so many passages I highlighted and flagged as I read through this book. This is a powerful and personal read that I cannot recommend more highly. I’ll leave you with a few quotes that have stuck with me from Eloquent Rage:⭐️ “We live in a nation that does everything to induce our rage, while simultaneously doing everything to deny that we have a right to feel it. American democracy is as much a project of suppressing Black rage as it is of legitimizing and elevating white rage. American democracy uses calls for civility, equality, liberty, and justice as smoke screens to obscure all the ways in which Black folks are treated uncivilly, unequally, illiberally, and unjustly as a matter of course.”⭐️ “The lie we are told is that white rage and white fear are honest emotions that preserve the integrity of American democracy…White rage and white fear are reactions to perceptions among white people that their power might be slipping away. Black rage and Black fear are fundamentally more honest, because they are reactions to the violence of white supremacy.”

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  70. Robin Graber

    You have to do this on audio. It’s like Cooper is just sitting next you to telling you everything you didn’t know you needed to hear. Her essays are powerful and necessary, but also have such a personal feel to all of them. Cooper discusses everything from rage, respectability politics, exceptionalism, and of course the magic of black women.I especially love that Cooper is so candid and open. She interweaves statistics and research with her personal experiences, making her essays easy to read compared to other texts that can be a little dry. Her openness is what makes these essays such incredible pieces to read.I also found it interesting that Cooper didn’t hold back on calling out black men for the ways they oppress black women. I knew coming in that she would call out white people (and if you find yourself getting defensive, it’s even more imperative you read this book), but I think sometimes it can be hard to call out people that we share traits with. Like I think about how sometimes we’re hesitant to call out other queer people because it feels like we’d be hurting the queer movement. But it’s incredibly necessary. And that’s how I feel here. Cooper knows how important it is to further the liberation of black women, and that means calling out black men when needed.This is a must read (or listen to) for anyone realizing that they need to have some frank conversations about the way we treat black women in America. So do NOT wait to pick up this book.

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  71. Nelson Franco

    For most of my life, I wondered what it would be like to walk in the shoes of a black person. What it must feel like for large groups of people to assume things about me based on the color of my skin? Some would most likely be positive such as being a great lover and having the ability to hit the dance floor with such style and rhythm. However, I largely believe that mostly negative assumptions would come my way from most Whites such as being lesser than Whites; e.g. intellectually, emotionally, meaner, lazier, poorer, and more aggressive. I can imagine, but I will never really know what it feels like to be black because I will never be black. Thanks to reading Dr. Cooper’s amazing book Eloquent Rage, I was able to have a small peek into the window of what it is like to be an over-achieving, brilliant, funny as hell, blunt as hell, sometimes hurting like hell, lonely as hell, mostly misunderstood power-house black woman. My guess is that if you are a black or white heterosexual male, you may shake your head after reading her book asking “what in the hell?”. I would also guess that if you’re a black woman reading this book, you would be laughing out loud, shedding tears, but mostly shaking your head whole-heatedly agreeing with Dr. Cooper. Me, I’m none of the above. My thoughts, WOW! I cannot stop thinking about what I’ve read and my guess, neither will you.

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  72. A. Allen

    Readimg Cooper’s work was like sitting down at the kitchen table having an authentic fierce chat on self awareness, awakening, identity politics and black feminism all at once. Cooper’s prose are critical and inviting. It moved me to reconsider my own body mapping as a source of meaning, vitality, and my vocational direction!

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  73. Amazon Customer

    While reading this book, I felt “seen” like no other book has done in a long time. I’m an educated black woman raised in inner city poverty. I read myself in this book. Brittney articulated the pain elegantly but also prescribed the salve to soothe the intersectional agony we all endure. Brittney also affirms that our rage isn’t the problem. We indeed have a lot to be angry about. Now more than ever, we need to let the powers that be feel our eloquent rage. It has the power to turn this world right side up again. Every black chick and lover of black chicks should pick this book up. You’ll be truly inspired.

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  74. Brittaney Carter

    Everyone should read this book. Dr. Cooper writes brilliantly, beautifully and courageously about her journey to embracing her rage as a Black woman. This book is a cathartic read and made me feel full of hope.

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  75. LMF

    Loved this book! So much of the author’s story resonated with me. I particularly found the white women = freedom/Black women – slavery concept thought-provoking.

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  76. Shonda

    Eloquent Rage is for anyone ready to get some of Brittney Cooper’s excellent work, but it is especially for Black women who have some things on their hearts and needed someone braver than them to speak it. It is for Black women still waiting for their deluxe apartment in the sky trying to figure out how either hang on until it comes or go ahead and buy something down on the first floor.

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  77. Raven Haymond

    Eloquent Rage is an honest and exceptionally personal account of one Black woman’s journey into feminism and self-ordained power. Cooper draws from her work as part of the Crunk Feminist Collective. Arguing that “We can neither heal nor fix that which we will not confront,” Cooper is blunt, to the point, and not afraid to make her readers uncomfortable (84). According to Cooper, we cannot effect change by remaining comfortable with our country’s history and cultural climate. While any scholar of gender or race will find this text illuminating, Cooper writes to a general audience. A must-read.

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  78. A. Loftus

    I both read this book and listened to it read to me by the author, whose mastery of the English language is superb. I only wish I had read it when I was in my early 20s (I’m in my early 50s) because she has a passage about friendships between women that resonated with me. Every young woman should read this book to understand how to be a better friend to their female friends. It’s a rarity that someone is so open about their intellectual journey and their relational journey, and how race factored into both journeys.Brittney Cooper is extremely smart and articulate, and verbally, she moves like Muhammad Ali. My vocabulary was expanded upon. She is indeed eloquent in her rage against how our society has diminished the advancements made by black women and how our society still expects black women to adopt the social mores of white women to get ahead in society. What surprised me most of all is that Brittney is in academia, but she has not chosen to reject her Christian faith. I admire her for this. She still embraces the faith she grew up with, although she challenges it, and still curses like a banshee. It’s an interesting juxtaposition. I am not on her intellectual level, but I would still love to meet her to discuss how she melds her faith with her superpower.

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  79. Kindle Customer

    I loved this so much!!! I literally have 5 other women reading it right now. I appreciate the words. Cooper masterfully articulated the struggle is black girls feel!

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  80. Nora-Ann Thompson O’che-Kemi

    I am grateful to my granddaughter who introduced me to this book. The use of self and connections with the South drew me in even more. I was unaware of drunk and now on a quest with that. I also see Beyonce music in a new awareness and understanding. This book was refreshing and enjoyable.😀

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  81. GoldenISW

    This book has pulled together and given a name to all that bubbles underneath the surface. Thank you Dr. Cooper for giving us a name to our thing! For being bold enough to own it and share your story. I love the humorous and honest accounts where growth is still occurring. This book is great for all—those who can find some semblance of themselves in Dr. Cooper’s journey and for those who can’t….sit, read, you may actually learn something and change a view-great work!

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  82. Vicki Noble

    The story she tells about herself is compelling and educational, but more than that, her political astuteness and searing analysis are spot on. I am at times confronted as a too-comfortable white person by her paradigm and other times I feel like a sister; at all times I feel like an ally. The way she transmits her anger and outrage are done in such an intelligent and lucid way that I am able to receive it without being defensive. Brava Brittney Cooper!

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  83. Jennifer Boyce

    If you are a white woman who considers herself to be woke, and to be an ally, but you haven’t read this book, then you are neither of those things. Dr. Cooper lays it out, unapologetically, and has taught me things about Black, and white, women that I never knew.Thank you for sharing, and for helping me understand some things about life in the US.

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  84. 1 O.

    This book should be with all women of color, but women from ALL walks would enjoy also. Feminism is for everyone to learn and understand for a better community for all humanity.

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  85. Lynnae B

    I also bought the audiobook because I like to hear authors read their words. This book slayed my doubts and affirmed what I’ve known to be true about being a Black woman and being a human being. Life is hard, the system isn’t fair AND we got this!

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  86. Jonna

    Dr. Cooper, thank you for helping me unbury my Joy. I urge everyone to read this book. May it guide us all as we rebuild this screwed up world (I’m looking at you white supremacy, patriarchy, and queerphobia).

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  87. Gregory A. Horlacher

    Extremely quotable. I love how her writing builds and builds almost so I can’t even tell my anger is rising and then BOOM! She hits us with the rage she feels – gives vent! Then she starts again. Perfectly titled.

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  88. Carolyn

    I still don’t know how to fix the system, but I now have a more grounded empathy for some of the people most affected by it.

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  89. JS

    This book gave the words to the experiences in my life I had no idea how to articulate. I felt seen and heard, as well as inspired and challenged. Thank you Dr. Cooper for this gift. I’ve already bought it for two other friends.

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    Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower
    Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower

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