The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

(90 customer reviews)

$10.15

0
Add to compare
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Named one of the most important nonfiction books of the 21st century by Entertainment Weekly‚Slate‚Chronicle of Higher Education‚Literary Hub, Book Riot‚ and Zora

A tenth-anniversary edition of the iconic bestseller—“one of the most influential books of the past 20 years,” according to the Chronicle of Higher Education—with a new preface by the author

“It is in no small part thanks to Alexander’s account that civil rights organizations such as Black Lives Matter have focused so much of their energy on the criminal justice system.”
—Adam Shatz, London Review of Books

Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.

Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander’s unforgettable argument that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” As the Birmingham Newsproclaimed, it is “undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S.”

Now, ten years after it was first published, The New Press is proud to issue a tenth-anniversary edition with a new preface by Michelle Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform movement today.

Specification: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Author

90 reviews for The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

5.0 out of 5
90
0
0
0
0
Write a review
Show all Most Helpful Highest Rating Lowest Rating
  1. Brian Rothstein

    I never write reviews. But in this case I really wanted to give this book five stars, so I got over my fear of ineloquence.What really shocked me about this book is how strongly it made me feel about the flaws in our criminal justice system. I already knew that the US has the largest prison population, that minimum sentencing laws have gotten out of hand, that the War on Drugs is a waste, that ex-convicts lose voting rights in many states, and things like that. I already had a sense that the justice system didn’t care about rehibilitating people so much as punishing them. But what Michelle Alexander brilliantly illustrates is that this system’s main target is the incarceration of people of color.I know. Duh, right? But seriously, even though you think you might realize it, the extent of the problem is truly mind boggling. Sure, the system arose via racially coded “tough on crime” politics. But it insidiously maintains itself, because politicians who would even try to address the problem worry about being seen as soft on crime. Additionally, selectively enforced laws allow for both conscious and unconscious biases to determine who is arrested, who is tried, and who is given the harshest sentences. Even worse, in our color-blind society, we have a hard time seeing that there is a problem. Sure, one in three black men between the ages of 20 and 29 are in prison or on parole, but Barack Obama is president. Therefore, there is no racial injustice, right? Even in the communities that are the targets of this selective justice, the social stigma of having family members in prison prevents people from rallying together to tackle the problem.This is not just a book on the unfariness of the criminal justice system, though. It’s also about the creation of a new second class citizen: The convicted felon. While it’s not legal to discriminate based on color, it’s perfectly legal to deny housing, jobs, and even voting rights to ex-criminals. What better way to assure criminal recidivism, right? It’s almost as if eliminating crime is not the main concern of the system!I’m not sure if I’m doing a good job of communicating what’s in this book. The stuff I’ve written sounds like stuff I’ve read before. Perhaps it would be better to give a link to the interview with Michelle Alexander that interested me in the book in the first place. It’s illuminating to see that even she, as director of the ACLU’s Racial Justice Project of Northern California, didn’t realize the extent of the problem until a particular incident:”And the light bulb went on: ‘Wow, he’s right about me. I’m no better than the police.’ I just started questioning myself: ‘How am I as a civil rights lawyer, just replicating all the same forms of discrimination I say I’m out here fighting against?'”Oh, I guess I’m not allowed to post a link to the article. You can find it online, though. It was in a newspaper called Real Change. The title of the article was One Nation, Under Lock and Key.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  2. Dexter Bradshaw

    “He shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free. And I do not see how we can solve the turbulent problem of race confronting our nation until there is an honest confrontation with it and willing search for the truth and a willingness to accept the truth when we discover it” –The Other America, Martin Luther King.In The New Jim Crow, Michelle Alexander set about to tell us the truth about an insidious racial injustice perpetuated in Black people of this country from it’s slave origins, through the black codes and Jim Crow laws after emancipation and Reconstruction, to a militarized criminal justice system and prison industrial complex targeting Black people. Her thesis is that slavery was never really abolished but merely evolved. She makes her heart-rending case with honesty, compassion, and amazing literary skill in 7 chapters.The book predates and predicts that the regular and unjust shooting deaths of Black men and women by the police will culminate in protests and the rise of a multiracial, global movement to change the culture of racial violence and caste in America. This book is an eye opener and a game changer. It is an honest and open voice on the problem of racial injustice in America. Most importantly it clearly lays out a truth we must all confront and acknowledge before having any national conversation on race in this country.My hope is that everyone reads it. Michelle Alexander’s voice in the work is a beautiful lament to racial justice. I pray that she sings on.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  3. Tobias Williams

    The Honorable Mrs. Michelle Alexander, with her book, exposes the so-called war on drugs, which was initially sanctioned and financially promoted by Ronald Reagan, as being a war waged against Black people. Professor Alexander reveals that the use of the politically correct phrase, “war on drugs”, is actually code language for “Get Blackey”. Like a mythical Pandora’s Box, clever racists in discriminatory fashion, manipulate and unleash anti-drug laws as necessary, to assist putting Blacks back in their proverbial place, by primarily pursuing Black males with the preconceived expectation that he is a drug offender. And if so, he is criminalized and branded as a felon for life. With crystal clarity, Mrs. Alexander express simply, that it’s not just the prison term, but the prison label that is so damning. By sleight of hand, the racist criminal justice system, then makes it politically correct for society to subject such Black casualties legally to eternal Jim Crow type discrimination and disenfranchisement in employment and voting, et cetera. The victors of war or the state, may then confiscate the spoils of war, from the legally-underrepresented Black offenders and others without a trial. The state cleverly lay drug charges against the property (building, car) and not the captive(s), because property isn’t entitled to free legal counsel. Last but not least, she advocates compellingly for the innocent Black victims and others that are forced to plea guilty to felonious charges stemming from traps like unethical drug sweeps, in return for a reduced sentence or an instant time served, do to mitigating circumstances like the caring for children and the diminution of funds.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  4. Lee M.

    This book came right on time the description of the contents of the book is spot-on in fact it’s modest if anything. This is a very powerful and thought-provoking read I am a criminal justice major graduating with my BA heading for my master’s and this book has been a great thought-provoking resource that has opened my mind to alternative ideas and thoughts.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  5. matthew a. barrett

    This book argues that mass incarceration is metaphorically, the New Jim Crow and that all races who care about social justice should fully commit themselves to dismantling this new racial caste system. “Mass incarceration—is the most damaging manifestation of the backlash against the Civil Rights Movement.” Essentially, the concept involved criminalizing mostly young black men, and placing them in a system that strips them of their rights and political power making them civiliter mortus; dead in the eyes of the law. Alexander cites landmark legal cases, laws, statistics and quotes from Civil Rights Activists to defend her argument.”The popular narrative that emphasizes the deaths of slavery and Jim Crow and celebrates the nation’s “triumph over race” with the election of Barack Obama is dangerously misguided. The colorblind public consensus that prevails in America today—i.e., the widespread belief that race no longer matters—has blinded us to the realities of race in our society and facilitated the emergence of a new caste system.”-Michelle Alexander

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  6. Les Medina

    The media could not be loaded.

     I gave the book itself 5 stars because the writing and overall historical explanation of mass incarceration due to a foundation of racism in the United States is extremely well done. However, I do not know what chapter 4 entails due to an extreme misprint. A portion of chapter 3 is in the middle of chapter 4 and the beginning of chapter 4 is printed twice. The numbers are out of order and it is extremely confusing to read. This is an unfortunate discovery as I have read and annotated the first half of the book. My suggestion: BUY THE BOOK from a small business that you can guarantee the quality AND CHECK THE CHAPTERS before diving in head first with a pen and highlighter.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  7. Russ Smith

    We used this book as a conversation starter in a discussion group. It was very helpful in a number of respects. First, the documented and statistically supported statements help allay any concerns of unfair representation. Second, it includes a lot a caveats and principles for ways to move forward with actual effect. Third, it doesn’t waste a lot of time condemning, and does much more on presenting how we got here. A few specifics can suffice as a representation of this: The author notes that the overall sentiment of our nation is not one of racism but raises the question then of how we can have a criminal justice system that disproportionally affects poor people of color. She actually points out that this is one of the hard things about our current system. It does not have any stated or legislated racist intent, yet it effectively targets poor black and Hispanic neighborhoods. The book also points out the fact that the War on Drugs not only doesn’t deal well with drug use issues and has a number of consequences that are additionally negative. She shows how “drug enforcement” and police militarization is well-supported by fines, fees, and especially property seizing. She notes how much mass incarceration procedures violate the principles of the 4th, 8th, and 14th Amendments.Much of the book will pose less of a challenge to progressives, calling into question conservative principles such as “law and order” not in principle, but in the way they’re carried out. However she doesn’t hold back on mentioning how Presidents Clinton and Obama, and VP Biden were all actively supporting the War on Drugs and the processes that led to mass incarceration on the levels we see today. By presenting how both major parties have supported this, she doesn’t let anyone assume that this is someone else’s fault.Yet the author largely avoids the shrill, blame-casting of many books on the issues surrounding racism, rather pointing out possibilities for addressing the issues and trying to actually solve the problem.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  8. AssembledSound

    Michelle Alexander takes on a multifaceted topic that affects the way in which justice is levied in the U.S. and she does it logically and carefully. What results is an indictment of so many aspects of our legal system, not just for people of color (blacks and hispanics, whatever their countries of origin), but for anyone the legal system chooses to target. In my opinion, it needs to be read by every person in the U.S. and anyone intending to come here. We are not the shining city on a hill we talk about, we are increasingly a place where people who are innocent of crime or who have committed relatively minor crimes are profiled, given little to no representation in our court system, given prison terms in excess of what reason dictates should be the case, treated as sub-humans in prison, and if they are released or paroled, are treated in many states as sub-humans for the rest of their lives. Alexander provides a prescription for correcting the numerous issues that have gotten us to this place, but little of it is easy. It is only if a majority of our political system and our citizenry demand change in this system of justice that we will ever have an appropriate and proportionate system in the country. We do not have such a system at present.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  9. Tiffany M.

    Book Review: The New Jim Crow Associate professor of law at Ohio State University, a civil rights advocate and writer, Michelle Alexander and her book, The New Jim Crow is about how even in today’s society, racism is still very prominent. She writes about how instead of having direct laws prohibiting African-Americans from voting, the government is using the excuse that convicted criminals are not able to vote, to deny the African-American population from voting. What seems like a book that is about how racism is still highly active in America turns into a book about how our judicial system here is biassed and unjust. My English teacher suggested this book to me, so I thought I’d read it. Another reason I was motivated to read it was because there has been so much public attention on what currently is happening with police violence involving the growing rate racial profiling on the part of law officers. In Alexander’s book, the core message throughout heavily highlights the racial dimensions of the War on Drugs. The book argues that federal drug policy unfairly targets communities of colour. This keeps millions of young, black men in a cycle of poverty and behind bars. It is clear that Alexander is able to create such a scholarly piece of literature based on her legal background. The book is supported by relevant data and case law. While I believe that there is a large truth factor to her opinion, I do not think that the government is purposefully planning to be racist toward individuals. I think that after so many years of living under Jim Crow laws that it is more of a subconscious series of actions being taken. Saying so, it does not make it okay, and I strongly agree with her book in that we have to first realise what is happening to be able to make changes so that racial biassing will come to a complete end. At the very beginning of the book, Alexander tells us who the book is written for. It’s written for the people who are victims of the war on drugs and. It’s also for all the people who cannot speak out because they are being oppressed. Alexander’s background in law helps her arguments by using clear and undebatable evidence. The way it is written makes your stomach ache and all of a sudden all your white guilt creeps up. For me it’s crazy that it took a book for me to realize the mass injustice of our nation. Alexander repeatedly points out that the main issue is that we just let this happen. The prisons in America are being overfilled everyday and the amount of people who are there for no other reason than they’re getting arrested because they’re black. Now no one would ever say this directly to anyone’s face but Alexander had the courage to write an entire book about the injustice. This book has sparked so many people’s attention that the book’s goal is starting to be achieved. Alexander’s main purpose of this book was to make it so people are aware of what is taking in this country. While the book was amazing, I do not think there were many counter arguments in her book. Her evidence was strong enough where she may have felt like she didn’t need it. Overall, I truly enjoyed reading the book. While at times the book made me feel awful, it also opened my eyes to an entirely new perspective. I know want to learn more in how I can make a difference from the racial injustice in this country.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  10. Kindle Customer

    This book really breaks down all the facets of modern racism and how much we need criminal justice reform the same way we needed to end slavery, and Jim Crow laws. Black Americans will never be free for as long as they are criminalized

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  11. D. Waterman

    I simply cannot praise this book enough. A massive indictment of US policy and the War on Drugs, Michelle Alexander has done us a great service by demonstrating how the historic legacy of slavery and segregation has effectively crippled the US justice system, undermined Human Rights and put the US on a war footing, internally with its own population and externally, by creating conditions that make life unbearable and force young Americans of colour into the army. This book is painful to read because it does not offer much scope for change, indeed, if the emphasis of the book had not been on race one would think it was about the Soviet Union under Stalin or North Korea. But after reading The New Jim Crow I catch myself wondering whether any other government in the world has ever devised such an intrusive set of controls on personal freedom. The picture that emerges is of a society at war with itself, unable to acknowledge its past and pursuing with vigor a disastrous course that can only end in totalitarianism. In Entheogens, Society & Law, Casey William Hardison and Daniel Waterman have examined the ideological basis for hegemonic control over what people can and can’t do with their own bodies and minds. (See the Amazon page). But up until now I was unaware of the degree to which race has always been a major force underpinning drug sentencing in the US. I thank Alexander for setting the record straight and I just hope enough Americans will read this book for it to effect a change of heart, if not of consciousness.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  12. Elizabeth Kaye

    Michelle Alexander uses facts and statistics with hard based evidence to back up each and every claim and statement. This is a truly amazing eye opener to the plights of African Americans and people of color living in America today. Everyone should read this. I have personally bought copies to pass out to others. It’s going to take the power of the people to incite change in our system. It’s great to see our younger generation (young white people included) who are finally opening their eyes and getting their heads out of the sand to see what our parents and grandparents in the white community have been turning a blind eye to. Just as I’m utterly disgusted and appalled at what my great grandparents’ & grandparents’ (with slavery) and my parents’ (with segregation & Jim Crow laws), generation allowed to happen & continue to the African American community by turning a blind eye and not standing up to fight for equal rights and for people of color to be treated with basic humanity, my children will be utterly appalled at what my generation (I’m currently 29) have allowed to continue with the “new Jim Crow” and I for one will use the power of my voice and actions to speak out and incite change. It’s going to take all of us together to make the government at local, state, and federal levels to change. Just with change on every other chaste system, it took many white people to open their damn eyes and stand up with their fellow Americans of color for change to occur!!! I pray that it ends with mine & the current generation and that my children’s generation will finally live in a true and fair system with completely equal opportunities for all people, especially for people of color!!Thank you Mrs. Alexander for your hard work & research and your dedication to making sure every fact was fully backed up with hard based evidence so that no person could refute or deny these claims. I believe this book will continue to open eyes and incite change in our world!!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  13. JWu

    this book has been a gamechanger in the world of racial justiceMichelle Alexander does an exhaustive study that can guide any of us in our understanding and increased efforts to create a world with more equity and kindness and justice

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  14. Michael Burress

    American people clarion wake up to oppressive programs and laws that ultimately imprisoned us all in the idea of false safety from things we were told were threats from our own fellow people. The tone can be uncomfortable for anyone that has conscious, we need to hear it, and then answer the call to give everyone the chance at The American Dream! We will all not be truly free until that day.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  15. M. JEFFREY MCMAHON

    After reading Michelle Alexander’s masterpiece The Jim Crow twice, I’ve decided to teach it in my critical thinking class. One, she is drawing the curtain on a devastating form of insidious racism using race-neutral language to strip young men of color of their human rights, labeling them as “criminals,” putting them in the prison system and forever stripping them of their human rights, voting, jury duty, housing, jobs, etc.The studies of the multi-billion-dollar prison industry, mostly housing poor men of color and exacting a double standard of justice, going after crack cocaine but not penalizing “white crimes” such as marijuana, alcohol, heroin, in the same manner. I was floored to see that 78 percent of drunk driving arrests are white males yet the jail-time is miniscule compared to crack cocaine offenses. And drunk driving kills 500 percent more people than all drugs combined.I was also stunned to see that there is a monetary incentive to keep the prisons expanding, that prisons employ 2.5 million Americans and that Dick Cheney has invested in the private prison system, which is a part of his stock portfolio.That we would make housing young people, stripping them of their rights, and encouraging criminal behavior by forcing them in prisons, and turn it into a profit motive while calling this “the War on Crime” is a great moral failure and Alexander has done a great service of exposing this morally bankrupt malady, what I would call Jim Crow 2.0.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  16. this mama

    The book arrived in good time. Perfect quality.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  17. Anita

    M. Alexander blew my mind with this book. While I’ve known most of the outlined issues discussed, never have I had such a wealth of information & statistics compiled into one book, one resource.As a white person, there are conversations I can have with other white people without being accused of playing the “race card.” (Still considered by some “too much,” by friends or family who are convinced that we’ve “made progress” or say they don’t “see color.) If I can use my voice to be heard when my friends & allies of color are silenced or brushed aside, I do, without making it about me. Being a credible resource is important to me and she sites everything.This book is crucial reading, if you’re on the fence, READ IT. If you’re not a person of color & talking about race makes you uncomfortable, or you think racism needs to be “gotten over” but still get a nagging feeling that things aren’t right, READ this book. If you need an arsenal of recent stats to try to plant a seed, this is a must own. It is not a personal attack against whiteness nor an ill-informed polemic; it’s bigger than ALL of us. Systemic racism is at the core of the War on Drugs & the criminal justice system (& white guilt isn’t helpful for change; listening, action & dialog are crucial.)If you’re looking for a broader view, I highly suggest “The New Jim Crow” in tandem with “Chasing the Scream” (Hari.) Both are critical together for an understanding of the prison industrial complex & why/how the “war in drugs” unfolded, who it’s effected & why there’s such a disparity between races, prison sentencing, arrests. One of the best books I’ve had the pleasure of reading in quite a while!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  18. Shelley

    The book was in great condition thank you!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  19. J

    A book everyone should read. Well written.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  20. Keisha Tiffany

    If I never recommend that u read anything I recommend this book. This book speaks of how black and brown people are held back first slavery, Jim crow and now mass incarceration. There was a point of time when poor whites voted with blacks because it made sense, we all were being oppressed by the same issues. Whites then noticed how blacks where becoming entrepreneurs and making more money and living better than them. Elite whites them convinced poor whites to vote their way because why should blacks do better and live better than them. Mass incarceration came about a means to keep us from being where we once were. Images depicted on tv screens show black people and the crack/cocaine time period and showed us as being drug dealers, users and of being over all aggressive. Laws were made to stop and halt the War on Drugs. Even though white people use and sell drugs at a much higher rate than we do, the camera was on us. This book was nothing short of amazing. I don’t wanna give too much of this book away but the main focus is that there are incentives given to police departments to arrest back people on trumped up drug charges and ultimately get them to plead guilty on felony charges and thus ruins their life by not being able to get jobs or even government assistance when they get out of jail. The goal is to understand that we don’t hold us back but the laws and goals of the government to keep us down as a people so. I do however not like the part of the book at the end where they speak of how affirmative action negatively affected white people, I was like really 🤔 how sway? Ur white in America and the odds are in ur favor. Over all very good book.🌻🌻🌻🌻

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  21. D7B8

    That book has the power to change the world.It hurts to say so but we are being racists by remaining silent, complicit by thinking that progress has been made and that segregation is either over (it is not) or too large of an issue. Connect the dots and don’t be fooled by the many black success stories that remain exceptions / distractions. There were plenty of complicit black success stories during Jim Crow too. As long as you sit on your own side of the bus you’ll be fine they say. As long as you comply to a police arrest based primarily on the color of your skin, you’ll be fine they say. SWAT teams don’t do routine search warrants on college dorms, even if they’d find as much if not more drugs over there, somehow they seem to prefer the uneducated and poor colored men and women hoods.Stop being fooled by the tactics that makes us believe that a satisfying progress has been made. It’s changing its clothes, but it’s no different.Mentalities MUST CHANGE and so does this political machine that keeps its lower colored cast in a cage before taking away any possible future rehabilitation upon release.Michelle Alexander is all about love and non violent spirit, yet her brilliance is fierce.You will be charged and empowered after reading this book and understand like me that It is URGENT to share that book and its content to as many people as we can and start to take action on a local level.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  22. Marla Taviano

    The more and more and more books I read, the more disturbed I become by the fact that so many of us Americans (white Americans in particular) have listened to, learned about, and believed a historical narrative that has effectively ignored, glossed over, prettied up, lied about what ACTUALLY has been happening in this country over the past 100 (200, 400) years.It’s a shock to the system when you start learning the truth. But it is so worth it.The author explains that she has written this book for a very specific audience–people who care deeply about racial justice but might not be aware of “the magnitude of the crisis faced by communities of color as a result of mass incarceration.”In other words, she says, she’s writing this book for the person she was 10 years ago.The U.S. has moved from one racial caste system to another over the relatively short time it has been a country. First, slavery. White people owned black people. Then, sharecropping. After slavery “ended,” black people could often find no jobs but to actually go back to work for the people who once owned them. They were technically “free” but made almost no money working the fields and had no way to fight for their rights. Then, segregation. People of color were kept out of basically everywhere. And, if they were allowed in, there were separate lines/entrances/seats for “white” and for “colored.”And now? Mass incarceration.“The fact that more than half of the young black men in many large American cities are currently under the control of the criminal justice system (or saddled with criminal records) is not–as many argue–just a symptom of poverty or poor choices, but rather evidence of a new racial caste system at work.” (16)In other words, people of color get pulled over more, arrested more, fined more, imprisoned more. Disproportionate to their crimes.The facts don’t lie.This is such an important book and should be required reading for every American.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  23. Roger

    Ms. Alexander has done a brilliant job of educating us about how the so-called War on Drugs has gone terribly wrong. The effects have left us with a situation which is a national disgrace. Millions of lives have been ruined and communities decimated.The book contains not only a detailed history of the War on Drugs but also legal issues (stated clearly for the lay public) and the social histories which are relevant.While I consider myself a progressive, she had to do some selling to me especially in regard to the theme of a racial caste system. In the end, as a psychologist, I had to agree because I came to see that the discriminatory effects were a function of the dark side of our social nature. Without clear prejudicial intent we may do considerable damage. And so, one of the unintended consequences is that we have created a new Jim Crow which is heavily focused on black and latino communities.Interestingly, in the end, there is something in this issue to recommend reform to both liberals and conservatives. Whether it is the waste of human lives or $200 billion spent per year on prisons for pointlessly punitive sentences, it cries out for reform.The purchaser needs to be aware this book is definitely not bedtime reading. It is deeply disturbing but essential reading if we are to continue to shape our society in a way consistent with our stated values.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  24. Mike

    The New Jim Crow should be mandatory reading for those who are unaware of the damage that our drug laws have in terms of exacerbating systemic racism. Liberals and progressives would value this book due to it highlighting the struggles the Black and Latino communities have faced due to the disproportionate enforcement of our drug laws (along with how the absence of good educational and economic opportunities have exacerbated this) while libertarians and real conservatives (the ones who believe in limited government and self-choice; not the ones who claim conservatism as a facade for their own racism) would acknowledge how the creation of black markets only strains law enforcement. This is an American problem, no matter how disconnected you may feel from it, and is a good place to start for people who want to become better informed on the topic of racial justice.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  25. Michael T.

    Man, did I enjoy this book, and it is not because I am in the amen corner on this topic. I actually went into it expecting it be a whiny read, but I was pleasantly surprised. Yes, there are some whining and blame shifting, but not as much as one would expect on such a subject.”The New Jim Crow” elicited many thoughts from me while reading. I would go from “amen, sister”, to “what the heck is she talking about”, to “hmm, I never thought about it like that before”, to “yep, you can tell she is from the elite black academia circles”, to “I thought I was the only one who noticed such”, to “yea, right, that’s a pipe dream”. And despite my personal conflicting views, I found it a remarkable read.Whether one agrees or disagrees with the subject matter at hand, it has to be acknowledged that this book has been a catalyst for prison reform becoming a part of the national political conversation. If that conversation results in a tangible change to the prison industrial system is yet to be seen, but if such a change occurs Michelle Alexander has earned some of the credit.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  26. Jo

    This should appear in people’s hands everywhere. We really DO keep the black man down. And I’m saying that as a Caucasian! We are all people! Okay, now that I’ve alienated you, read on and see what you think. This is a scholarly book with an adult reading level, references to back up given factual evidence of the author’s startling proposition: too long a history, so despicably sneaky, and the worst? Almost no one except the author, whom I trust so far, (for her clear lines of reasoning backed by evidence and facts), has “seen” something horrendous going on in America. WHY racism? I’ve never understood it, but when it’s present both ways, it’s scary, like my miserable time in Arkansas, where my husband took a promotion. I was never so glad to come home when I got a glimpse of this beautiful state I now live and will die in. But we are still left with flawless reasoning about something deeply secret and hidden and rotten to the core. We don’t whip our slaves anymore, we find any way we can and jail them, then take away everything from them, and when they get out they are “non-citizens.” This affects all of us. This is expensive, corrupt, frightening and disgraceful. Behold, The New Jim Crow.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  27. Kiza

    This book was honestly pretty eye opening for me, and despite having been released 10 years ago it is extremely relevant even to this day when looking at things. In the book, it discusses topics related to race-related issues specific to black american males, and how our criminal justice system has morphed into this tool to enforce new modes of discrimination and oppression that are strikingly similar to the time of jim crow laws.The book primarily focuses on the discrimination faced by black Americans, but mentions how it also applies to other minorities and even poor white populations.The author goes over a wide range of topics like a road map discussing how we got to this point. The primary argument is that this system creates an under caste that is hidden from view and rationalized by everyone among all races due to people being stigmatized as ‘criminals’. Those in this under caste become trapped in a never ending cycle of marginalization where they can’t move up in society and become trapped.The book hits many topics such as misconceptions we have about the justice system, how rights can be stripped away even after serving a prison sentence fully, how the failed war on drugs marginalized poor black communities, how the supreme court has denied the ability to challenge cases based of racial biases, and many other issues throughout history.The book primarily focuses on the war on drugs era as a leading tool that was used to create this system of mass incarceration. However it also touches on many historic elements as well, that I found extremely fascinating and eye opening.The book is very long but I would hope that wouldn’t discourage people. Through-out my entire read of this book I learned many things I had no idea about, and the parallels the author makes between our system of mass incarceration and former jim crow laws were very strong.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  28. Michelle H

    As an African- American female, I found the issues Alexander discusses regarding racism in America and the “colorblindness” of other races very relatable. The first line of the book, “this book is not for everyone,” forces the reader to automatically decide if they wish to keep reading or not. I fortunately did. Alexander, a criminal rights lawyer and former clerk for Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, is very knowledgeable about racism and criminal justice in America which perfectly qualifies her to publish such a groundbreaking book regarding this topic. The book argues two main topics, first, America is and has always had a problem with racism that simply transforms over time, and second, that many American citizens think racism has disappeared over the past decade, and it has not. As a minority living in America, I completely agree with Alexander’s arguments that race continues to be a problem for our country and that many citizens are blind to this racism. As a college student at a predominately white institution, I think it was necessary for me to read this book and discuss these issues with my friends of other races. Not enough people are comfortable talking about race yet, and it is a shame. I would highly recommend this book.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  29. Harry Grant

    A true horror story set in These States – America – not the old Soviet Union or Nazi Germany. And current. One must have a strongstomach to read this. I have to wonder if the Criminal Justice System of the US is not just what it says: a Criminal System of rendering justice.After reading this, there is little wonder for the contempt many have of the police – the first step to entering this domaine of hell. Its the oldclass struggle in full flower. Race is a component. Being poorly educated, living in wretched conditions, having poor health care, poor job opportunities, exploitive “religion” and little to no family life are components as well. Black and poor. Guilty. The judgement came from where and what the person was born into. Original “sin” brought on by rampant Capitalism and the government it controls. Their salvation may only come fromarmed revolt. A peaceful settlement? So long overdo that it is impossible.A must read for 2016 as “The Other America” was to the early 60’s.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  30. Kraig

    This book absolutely makes the case for what most of us don’t have any clue is happening in a raw, educated, and mindblowing way. There is no way that anyone with a compassionate and empathetic mind could not be altered after reading this. The evidence within is sound and convincing. You cannot unknow once you KNOW.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  31. The Careful Observer

    Slavery supposedly ended in 1865, at the end of The Civil War. So, we are told. Then, here comes Professor Michelle Alexander to tell us that simply is not true. Slavery’s child was something called Jim Crow, a whole system of laws designed to thwart the lives of African-American people on so many different levels. In order to fight Jim Crow, The Civil Rights Movement waged war on many fronts, many of them legal. The thinking went that if the legal barriers were dropped, the lives of African-Americans would be so much better. Or, so it was thought. Then came Ronald Reagan into the office of the Presidency. A War was waged, the so-called, “War On Drugs.” This has led to the fact that all over America, people of color, but particularly Black Men and the poor, are herded into prisons, with all kinds of drug charges and laws. These charges result in a whole system that selectively targets where it will be “enforcing” the drug laws. If a certain community has a predominance of drug activity, but yet law enforcement never bothers to scrutinize that community, then drug dealers from that community will never be charged. Studies have shown that there is no more drug activity in Black Communities than in others, but the Prison/Industrial Complex is set up in such a way that only certain communities are scrutinized, or disproportionally, scrutinized for them. Of course if the police never look for drugs in a certain place, they will never find them. When those who have been caught up in the system become released from prison, now it becomes “legal” to discriminate against them. Their “records” can be used to discriminate against them in employment, housing, education, in a word–everything. Welcome to “The New Jim Crow.” Right here in America. Home of the free. A Democracy. Who wants to laugh? (to keep from crying?). In thumbnail sketch, this is what Michelle Alexander lays out in her book, the unfairness of it all, how it makes a mockery of the concept of justice and Democracy. It is Professor Alexander’s opinion that the phenomenon that she spells out, The Prison/Industrial Complex, should become the basis for the next Civil Rights Movement. In this respect, I think that she is right. Although Professor Alexander is an attorney, what is most fascinating about her book is how she tells her personal story as basically being an oblivious, average citizen, who thought that when people said the war on drugs was a war on Black people, they were exaggerating. But, as she began to look into things, she saw the truth of this thesis and ultimately felt she had to do something about it. This, in part, led to her book. This book is written in a very readable style so that it is available to the average reader. I think Professor Alexander’s book is excellent in educating and bringing to the spotlight what needs to be our next Civil Rights Movement. Words cannot really express my gratefulness to her for doing this. In talking about the Prison/Industrial Complex, there is another book that can be found right here on Amazon that complements Alexander’s. It’s called “The Anatomy Of Prison Life” by Charles L. Hinsley. It is the most honest and real account that one will ever find on what it means to be in prison, written from the eyes of a Black Man first/Former Warden perspective. It is well worth your time. One should mull over in one’s mind, as one reads, the connection between the Alexander and Hinsley books. For those interested in the more general subject of Black Studies, there’s a book called, “Reality’s Pen: Reflections On Family, History & Culture,” by Thomas D. Rush that gives some good background to the 2 books mentioned above. Rush’s book can also be found right here on Amazon. In Rush’s work, we get to see the “average Joe’s” fascinating 1989 account of two very long conversations with what will eventually become the first African-American President in American History. It’s good to get this account because it occurs long before President Obama is famous, between two people just going about the daily business of their lives. What makes the interaction even more compelling is the fact that Obama innocently lays out an image of what he hopes to see occur within his romantic life, a romantic life prior to the time of his introduction to Michelle. It is oh so fascinating, and can be found in the piece on page 95 of Rush’s work called, “You Never Know Who God Wants You To Meet.” Rush’s book also contains additional Black Cultural anecdotes of richness, making it an overall, well-rounded book and worthy of your purchase.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  32. Kier

    My views align with the authors views and I’m excited to read this over winter break.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  33. Cindy Warlick

    Haven’t read it yet….but know we all should…..I’ve been told to wait and read it with my book club people….that it’s a difficult read….subject matter of course….

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  34. Skiler

    The New Jim Crow is embedded in colonization prior to the founding of white men in power This book dispels the myths and lies and exposes the structured underclass which is institionalized in America.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  35. Amazon Customer

    Everyone who cares about the direction our country is heading should read this book. I read it because my son, who teaches government and economics in East Palo Alto, asked me to do so and then discuss it together. Having been a missionary with Maryknoll in Tanzania for four years, I thought I was aware and informed. Now I know that most of us who are “white” have no real idea of what it is like to be “other”. We need to know and then join together to effect change and truly live and help others to live what we claim to believe, that “all men are created equal” and have the same rights!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  36. Eddie Hutchinson

    Author, Michelle Alexander, presents a compelling argument that there is a segment of society, the Undercaste, which is created and sustained by a vast system of law enforcement procedures, laws and social exclusion. Because it is designed to keep people of color in a perpetual cycle of marginality, Alexander resurrects a name from the past and labels this system The New Jim Crow.Alexander describes how the system of Mass Incarceration begins with the `The Round-Up’. The War on Drugs, with its race-neutral language, is the vehicle in which “…a vast number of people are swept into the criminal justice system by the police who conduct drug operations primarily in poor communities of color.” (pg. 180) More of the racial undertow is revealed with a discussion on how the drug use of people of color vs. the drug use of White America is not proportional to the numbers of each being charged and sentenced.Alexander, a professor of law and Civil Rights lawyer, details the next stage, Formal Control, and how felony charges are applied, how deals and plea bargains are made and how mandatory drug sentencing precludes anything but prison time and, most importantly, the label of `felon’ or `criminal’ .In the final stage, Invisible Punishment, it is shown how after being released from prison, the difficulties one faces mostly due to laws and sanctions, making re-integration back into mainstream society an almost impossibility. “Today a criminal freed from prison has scarcely more rights, and arguably less respect, than a freed slave or a black person living `free’ in Mississippi at the height of Jim Crow.” (pg. 138)Although Alexander suggests that the remedy for this nearly invisible racial caste system is beyond the scope of this book, she does outline key principles that are needed to lead us down the road to reform.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  37. Migbird

    Some sadly may not like the conclusions rendered but undeniable. The evidence is overwhelming. The new Jim Crow is real and what is really surprising is that anyone would question that reality.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  38. James A. Brannan

    Wow. This is an incredibly eye opening book. Regarding the one-star review that said “believe white people are the devil”, that’s the thing about this book, you don’t have to believe that white people are the devil to see the insidiousness of what transpired. Just as we would explain that a penguin has flippers to swim as a biological adaptation to a life around water, so to we can explain the drug war. Perhaps, white folk didn’t consciously use the drug war as a means of controlling young black males, but the results are exactly the same as if evolution led to flippers in a penguin. The war on the drugs DID lead to the results she describes in this book, so knowing that, can we still justify it? But the most revealing part of the book is the court case after court case where any two year old could see through the wrangling by the justices where arguments that wouldn’t even fool a four year old is used by the supreme court to uphold clearly biased results. Put the drug war to the scrutiny of a historian 200 years in the future…what would he or she write about it? A disturbing book.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  39. djbinthecosmos

    So, I thought I was a well-informed, “woke” white man, reading intensively in the burgeoning literature of the Black Lives Matter era. Yet, this reprint of a book I missed at first printing, takes me back to school. Yes, I recognize my readings of W.E.B. DeBois and Frederick Douglas, but somehow it’s like first exposure as Alexander pushes us through the fog of whiteness to see anew. And, this reappears just as the new Jim Crow is underway in state GQP legislatures across the country to once again suppress the votes that won’t tolerate, to secure the white supremacy they won’t yield, because they never really surrendered at Appomattox. Humbly, THANK YOU!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  40. JuLee Rudolf

    …decent schools. They were rounded up by the millions, packed away in prisons, and when released, they were stigmatized for life, denied the right to vote, and ushered into a world of discrimination.” (p 175)This book, which I bought for my husband and immediately borrowed to read myself, was not what I expected. In it, the author theorizes that the War on Drugs, begun by Reagan and continued under every successive president, has resulted in a contemporary system of Jim Crow laws against persons of color. She discusses things like mandatory sentencing laws for those charged with drug-related crimes (including disparities in the more stringent standards for, say, crack cocaine versus powder) and the prevalence of plea bargaining, which many accused of crimes choose to take over the wait and risk of going to trial, not necessarily knowing that when they agree to a plea for a felony, the long term ramifications of being labeled a felon are significant, and affect: future employment opportunities, voting rights and often negate a person’s right to receive social services.Chapter by chapter, page by page, fact by fact – Alexander makes her case. As I began to read, I could not believe that so many persons in America are in prison on drug-related charges, prison statistics sites; however, confirmed her contentions time and again.According to the author (p 16), “What this book is intended to do—the only thing it is intended to do—is to stimulate a much-needed conversation about the role of the criminal justice system in creating and perpetuating racial hierarchy in the United States. The fate of millions of people—indeed the future of the black community itself—may depend on the willingness of those who care about racial justice to re-examine their basic assumptions about the role of the criminal justice system in our society. The fact that more than half of the young black men in many large American cities are currently under the control of the criminal justice system (or saddled with criminal records) is not—as many argue—just a symptom of poverty or poor choices, but rather evidence of a new racial caste system at work.”Since reading the book, I’ve recommended it to a number of friends (none of whom has chosen to read it…yet). The book has opened my mind to the ideas Ms. Alexander has put forth and its content has surprised me more than any book I’ve read in recent years. It should be on every American’s Required Reading list for 2016.Also excellent: All Aunt Hagar’s Children by Edward P. Jones, Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin and To Sir with Love by E.R. Braithwaite.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  41. Jenny Hanniver

    Having grown up as a white woman in the South and living in Southern states about 1/3 of my long lifetime, I saw and heard suspicious evidence and years ago, as early as the Reagan hegemony, drew similar conclusions. This necessary book, The New Jim Crow, reinforces my conclusions and provides the details–some of which shocked even someone who had long been following the travesty of the incarceration of young African Americans.Some Americans of all races are still so ignorant of reality they believe that most of the people in prison are actual felons, real criminals like murderers or burglars. They have been propagandized by a conspiracy that dates back to Reagan, and need to read Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, where they will learn that Reagan and his Karl Rove crew instituted alarmist fear as a political ploy. Since crime and drug use had been declining in the 1970s, the Republican Party (instead of rejoicing) grew alarmed. A contented and prosperous nation isn’t easy to manipulate. So out of nothing they created a nightmare propaganda tool to give their old whine of Lawnorder a huge p-r opportunity. Perhaps it got away from them, since it is now mowing our nation down to the dirt.The mass media, of course, went along with Reagan’s fantasies and the Big Lie of the War on Drugs worked. Scared voters ate it up, voted out sensible members of Congress, replaced by fanatic right-wingers paid off by the rising Oligarchs, who approved their own kind as regulators, judges and Supreme Court justices, and refused to even consider anyone who could not be manipulated. With our last two Supreme Courts, our Constitutional rights have been twisted and undermined to the point where an innocent person wrongly imprisoned no longer has even a thread of legal recourse.The awful results are now bloated beyond even Rush Limbaugh’s drug-fantasies and waistline. Private prison building, along with lethal gas fracking and foreign pipelines leaking into our soil to export tar sands oil to foreign countries, are the fastest growing U.S. industries, on behalf of something erroneously called “capitalism”—although Adam Smith, an honorable man, would consider our economic system to be his loathed Mercantile Oligarchy reborn, and definitely not what he envisioned as “capitalism”. Under our current system, private prisons are subsidized by state politicians and to keep raking in money, both need new bodies for the cells. Paid informers make false accusations, police forces are now armed and trained for free by the military, get paid overtime for extra arrests, and manage to terrify and kill numerous innocent bystanders as victims of police shootouts during daily stop-and-frisks and break-ins of their homes. Any gun-toting white man in Florida (where I grew up as a white Middle Class teenager) can kill at will—and they do. The ones who suffer most are people of color and the rest of the poor. You don’t need to do anything to get arrested, indicted and convicted on a plea-bargain but have the wrong color of skin or accent, lack money, live in a run-down city or neighborhood, have a mental problem or addiction, and/or be homeless and wandering. Any one of those will enable you to fall helplessly into our penal Slough of Despond and there’s a good chance you’ll die there.Studying the issues is a necessary educational step. Mass action is more important, but hard to engender. Truly ignorant people still think that the people rotting in our prisons actually perpetrated some violence to a victim. Not true. Our mean, punitive prisons incarcerate an enormous percentage of innocent poor people, or persons who never would have arrested in earlier times, who accept 4 year sentences under the plea bargaining, “Three Strikes and You’re Jailed for Life” and “No Parole” laws set up by America’s controlling rulers. What the vast majority of prisoners really need are treatment centers, a place to live, better education—and jobs. And that is exactly what the pseudo-capitalists refuse to do. Our prisons and the ridiculous punitive laws, throwing innocent kids in with hardened murderers, rapists and muggers, then penalizing those who have been released with loss of public privileges and the vote, are the primary creators of violence, embitterment, and actual crime. Our arrest and prison system teaches our kids how to be criminals and makes them recidivists—but as Michelle Alexander’s neutral legal prose corroborates, to some of its sneakiest designers that was its purpose all along.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  42. William Collins

    This is an excellent book. It is well written, insightful and thoroughly researched. It clearly presents how race is used by the privileged white male minority to subjugate and divide poor people. It traces this phenomenon historically in America from slavery through the first Jim Crow which came about after Reconstruction, to what she describes today as the new JIm Crow which is post Civil Rights. she articulately explains that even though the post Civil Rights era is characterized by colorblind it in fact is not and the War on Drugs has in fact used the criminal justice system to create a racial undercaste composed of primarily black and brown males.As a black attorney practicing in this system I have seen this first hand and Ms Alexander’s book put into perspective and articulately explained something that I have been a witness to for years. The criminal justice system is being used unfairly to prosecute “just us” and the result has been devastating for our communities in particular and America in general. the dichotomies produced by this situation are alarming as they are outstanding. America has elected its first Black President but continues to incarcerate more people (the majority of whom are of color) than any other nation in the world. Thanks to affirmative action some of us get into and graduate from the finest educational institutions and are positioned to live good lives yet the police kill young black males with impunity and the justice system offers little if any recompense. It is clear that in America young black male lives do not matter and this is a racial issue which must be confronted.Ms Alexander confronts this issue head on in her book. It is a good read which I would recommend to anyone who has a social conscious and is interested in making a positive change in this country.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  43. Midwivesrfit2

    This book opened my eyes.There are many powerful statements in this book but here are a few that stuck with me. “Arguably the most important parallel between mass incarceration and Jim Crow is that both have served to define the meaning and significance of race in America. Indeed, a primary function of any racial caste system is to define the meaning of race in its time. Slavery defined what it meant to be black (a slave), and Jim Crow defined what it meant to be black (a second-class citizen). Today mass incarceration defines the meaning of blackness in America: black people, especially black men, are criminals. That is what it means to be black.””The United States imprisons a larger percentage of its black population than South Africa did at the height of apartheid. In Washington, D.C., our nation’s capitol, it is estimated that three out of four young black men (and nearly all those in the poorest neighborhoods) can expect to serve time in prison.”I highly recommend this book to anyone who really want to understand about mass incarceration and how it effects everyone in America.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  44. Mad Dog

    If you really want to know the extent of white privilege and how it survives given that most Americans are not outwardly racist anymore, this is the book for you. As Michelle Alexander points out in great detail, white privilege exists today in America in the form of mass incarceration, the generic term for the fact that despite being a supposedly “free” country, we manage to imprison more of our citizens than any other country on earth, even Russia or China. But more than that, a very high percentage of these people are black, and in fact they go to prison at a rate disproportionate to the frequency with which they commit crimes. To be blunt, if you are caught selling illegal drugs in most states, you are likely to go to prison if you are black, but you will more likely get treated more leniently if you are white. It’s worse than that, because, unlike most other developed nations, we make certain that once someone is convicted of a felony, he loses the vote, his right to public housing, the ability to get a job, in other words, he can be discriminated against for life. But he committed the crime so he deserves it, right? Not so fast – whereas whites commit many crimes at the same rate as blacks or even higher, especially drug crimes, they go to prison much less often. Blacks have to be perfect – dot their i’s and cross all their t’s. It’s not realistic, and it’s unfair.Alexander points out that this is nothing more than a new system to marginalize and discriminate against blacks, and calls it “the new Jim Crow”. If anything, it’s more accurate to call it the new slavery. Just go to Angola State Prison in Louisiana and watch all the black prisoners working in the cotton fields. Look familiar? Now how did this happen? How did the number of Americans behind bars go from 350,000 (still a high number) to over 2 million in the last 30-40 years? A large part of it was the War on Drugs, started by Nixon around 1970. Alexander traces the history of the drug war, and describes how it became a vehicle for mistreating blacks even in the face of prevalent “colorblind” attitudes of most Americans today. We don’t directly label blacks as inferior and make them ride the back of the bus today, we just try real hard to get them labeled as felons, then we can discriminate. And most Americans don’t realize we’re doing it and how much damage this causes. It’s also expensive and a waste of taxpayer dollars.In the final chapters Alexander offers some ideas on how to dismantle this system. It’s very hard, and it’s not enough to file lawsuits in individual cases. It requires a major protest movement. Many things have to be undone, such as the entire drug war, disenfranchisement laws, the management of prisons by private corporations to name a few. But the resistance will be huge because many jobs would disappear, and no one wants to be seen making life better for criminals. Also, colorblindness won’t do – we need to be conscious of racial differences yet driven to treat everyone with respect, fairness and kindness. It’s a totally different mindset for most Americans. Especially fascinating was her description of how such concessions, or “racial bribes”, as affirmative action serve to justify continuing the system as it is. Affirmative action has helped a lot of blacks become successful, but it glosses over the main problem. The fact that we have a black President also obscures the real issues.Alexander states also that a full treatment of how to fix this problem would require another book, and I eagerly await that. In the meantime, please read this one.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  45. Beverly Ozanne

    Michelle Alexander has written a well-researched book on the ills of mass incarceration and the motive behind keeping so many Black and Brown men caged in the US. It’s amazing that there are nearly 2.3 million men and women locked up in prison over minor crimes. Prisons don’t rehabilitate and are one of the United States’ dirty secrets. Did you know that many prisons are privately owned and make millions of dollars for those who invest in them? I highly recommend reading this book in order to educate yourself on how mass incarceration has been implemented to keep men of color down. Hopefully Michelle’s writing will stimulate some of us to take action to free those who are unjustly incarcerated!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  46. Robert M. Hill

    If this book doesn’t make you angry, there’s something wrong. It should be read by every judge, prosecutor, defense lawyer, probation officer and cop in the country. These people need to know that they are participating, perhaps without even knowing it, in a profoundly unjust system that is as immoral as Jim Crow and maybe even as immoral as slavery.Ms. Alexander begins by identifying, as part of her target audience, people who are passionate about issues of racial justice in the criminal justice system and need to be armed with facts and data and argument to make their case. I was one of those people. But I came out of this book with more than an argument against the belief, held by many perfectly intelligent people I know, that the criminal justice system is race neutral. I started this book with an intuitive understanding as a lawyer, that the are elements of unconscious, subtle racism at every level of the criminal justice system, but I was optimistic that the necessary fixes were a matter of tweaking and tinkering and an evolution in our thinking about race. Now I feel kind of naive and out of touch for having thought that.The author does not merely make a sound argument that the system of mass incarceration is the new Jim Crow (and in many ways worse than the old Jim Crow). She proves this argument with a compelling factual and statistical case that can’t be denied even as she explains why it IS IN FACT denied by governments and by American society collectively. This, along with the deplorable state of public education financing and resulting inequities in educational opportunity, is the civil rights issue of our time, and it requires a new and courageous civil rights movement to seek a remedy.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  47. Allen E.

    Honesty

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  48. Jessica Sullivan

    I came into this book with a pretty decent grasp on Alexander’s thesis—thanks in part to the deserved hype her work has received over the years—but found myself captivated as she connected the dots on so many different aspects of mass incarceration, the War on Drugs, Jim Crow, and the historical intersection between classism and racism.Alexander notes in her preface that she wrote this book specifically for people who already care about racial justice, and if you’re one of those people, I urge you to read this with the promise that you will come away from it with a much more comprehensive understanding of our current racial caste system.It’s so well-researched, so informative, and so compelling. I’ve seen some readers lament that Alexander spends parts of the second half of the book rehashing arguments from the first half, but this approach actually worked for me: by reiterating certain points throughout, she helped me better understand their context within the bigger picture.Finally, I have to say that reading this book now—during this point in time—was especially impactful. I learned that there’s a deep history of politicians and wealthy whites exploiting white working class vulnerabilities and racial resentments in order to preserve power and deliberately driving a wedge between poor whites and poor minorities. With so much talk right now about the economic anxieties of white working class Trump voters, I came away from this book with an even deeper conviction that pandering to poor and working class whites exclusively is absolutely not the answer. Rather, we need a real movement that addresses class struggles among all races so that we don’t risk history continuing to repeat itself.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  49. Maya Angelica Hernandez

    Written and organized well in order to hone in certain points. I thought I knew a good amount about this topic but learned so much more. Very important reading.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  50. Lynn Russell

    I cannot say I “enjoyed” this book. But I can say I am grateful it was recommended to me and that I read it.My eyes were opened to how little I understand about an enormous problem that is right in front of me. Reading this book made me feel depressed and overwhelmed at times. But achieving awareness is a critical first step in being able to make decisions that help to move things in a more positive direction.The book is well written. There are many legal references to back up statements made. Several perspectives are offered in many areas.The bottom line is that a messed up focus on Mass Incarceration has become embedded in our “justice” system, creating much greater harm than good. Many of us don’t even realize this. And once we do, where do we go from there?

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  51. Mac McEneaney

    Great book & wasn’t damaged in shipping, so 10/10!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  52. George F. Greene

    This is one of the must reads of the decade. Sadly it’s in vogue for people on the right to believe that any race problems we may have are fixable if only black people would have just a little more “personal responsibility”. As if it’s a simple lack of will. The “I don’t see color” phrase is intended to mask the persistent racism that hobbles a good portion of our fellow citizens and deprives our nation of the valuable contributions of so many.Alexander shows how our national shame of slavery morphed into the shame of sharecropping, peonage, Jim Crow segregation and, after civil rights became law, the war on drugs. Alexander chronicles the intentionally quiet and steady institutionalization of racism in law enforcement, courts and prisons that results in disenfranchisement of huge numbers of people and saddles us all with tremendous and unnecessary costs. Like a frog in a pot of boiling water, we didn’t see it happen, but the extent is both astounding and tragic. The reality Alexander reveals, backed up by an extensive survey of the research and the statistics, is overwhelming and truly saddening. As a white, active liberal, Alexander has handily convinced me that I didn’t know nearly as much I thought I did and that I am not doing as much as I ought to.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  53. Valerie L

    I’ve listened to the audiobook of this title three times now (with spaces in between – not back to back). I pull something new from it every time. Every person in the USA needs to read this book. It’s not an easy book, but it’s very eye-opening and something that every person needs to know and understand. I highly, highly recommend this book.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  54. Steven H Propp

    Michelle Alexander is a visiting professor at Union Theological Seminary. She wrote in the Preface to the 10th Anniversary Edition of this book, “[In 2008] I wanted Barack Obama to win. And I feared it. I worried that, if a black man were elected president … our nation would sink further into denial, and no one would listen to the message that I felt desperate to convey: we are not free of our racial history. To the contrary, a new caste system has been born again in America, a system of mass incarceration unlike anything the world has ever seen… I was right to worry.” (Pg. x)She continues, “I did not, and could not, know when writing this book that our nation would soon awaken violently from its brief colorblind slumber… We now have white nationalist movements operating openly online and in many of our communities; they’re … recruiting thousands into their ranks. We have a president who routinely unleashes hostile tirades against black and brown people—calling Mexican migrants ‘murderers,’ ‘rapists,’ and ‘bad people,’ referring to developing African nations as ‘s-ithole countries,’ and smearing the majority-black city of Baltimore as a ‘disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess.’ Millions of Americans are cheering, or at least tolerating, these racial hostilities. And yet… we also have vibrant racial justice movements led by new generations of activists… as well as growing movements against criminal injustice led by those who are directly impacted by mass incarceration. Many of these movements aim to redefine the meaning of justice in America.” (Pg. xiii)She goes on, “It is tempting… to write an updated version of ‘[this book] that would account for all that has occurred. The new, revised version would describe how and why our nation has swung dramatically from … a ‘race to incarcerate’… to a bipartisan commitment to downsizing our prison system during the same period of time that a liberal, black president drastically expanded the system of mass deportation and mass surveillance.” (Pg. xvi) “The new, expanded version of this book would describe the relationship between the politics of mass incarceration… and the role of prison profiteering in the expansion of these systems… But telling the story of everything that has changed and remained the same would require a new book entirely.” (Pg. xviii)She explains, “I’m frequently asked… what about violent crime?… I chose to focus my attention on the exponential increase in arrests, prosecutions and sentences for nonviolent crime and drug offenses…. I thought that the time was overdue for public attention to be focused on state violence, rather than violence committed by individuals in impoverished, segregated communities suffering from economic collapse.” (Pg. xxii)Later, she summarizes, “A new social consensus must be forged about race about the role of race in defining the basic structure of our society if we ever hope to abolish the New Jim Crow. This new consensus must begin with dialogue, a conversation that fosters a critical consciousness, a key prerequisite to effective social action. This book is an attempt to ensure that the conversation does not end with nervous laughter.” (Pg. 19)In the Introduction, she outlines, “I had come to suspect that… the criminal justice system … was not just another institution infected with racial bias but rather a different beast entirely… I came to see that mass incarceration in the United States had, in fact, emerged as a stunningly comprehensive and well-designed system of racialized social control that functions in a manner strikingly similar to Jim Crow.” (Pg. 4-5)She notes, “The decline in legitimate employment opportunities among inner-city residents created economic desperation, leading some to sell drugs—most notably crack cocaine… Joblessness and crack swept inner cities precisely at the moment that a fierce backlash against the Civil Rights Movement was manifesting itself through the War on Drugs. No one should ever attempt to minimize the harm caused crack cocaine and the related violence… Numerous paths were available to our nation in the wake of the crack crisis, yet for reasons traceable largely to racial politics and fearmongering, we chose war. Conservatives found they could finally justify an all-out war on an ‘enemy’ that had been racially defined years before.” (Pg. 65)She observes, “the people who wind up in front of a judge are usually guilty of some crime. The parade of guilty people through America’s courtrooms gives the false impression to the public—as well as to judges—that when the police have a ‘hunch,’ it makes sense to act on it… The truth, however, is that most people stopped and searched in the War on Drugs are perfectly innocent of any crime… The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) trains police to conduct utterly unreasonable and discriminatory stops and searches throughout the United States.” (Pg. 88-89)She states, “Most people imagine that the explosion in the U.S. prison population during the past twenty-five years reflects changes in crime rates. Few would guess that our prison population leaped … in such a short period of time due to changes in laws and policies, not changes in crime rates. Yet it has been changes in our laws… that has been responsible for the growth of our prison system, not increases in crime.” (Pg. 117)She points out, “Any notion that drug use among blacks is more… dangerous is belied by the data; white youth have about three times the number of drug-related emergency room visits as their African-American counterparts. The notion that whites comprise the vast majority of drug users and dealers… may seem implausible to some… however, the prevalence of white drug crime—including drug dealing—should not be surprising. After all, where do whites get their illegal drugs? Do they all drive to the ghetto to purchase them from somebody standing on a street corner?… Whites tend to sell to whites, blacks to blacks… The notion that most illegal drug use and sales happens in the ghetto is pure fiction.” (Pg. 124)She suggests, “From the outset, the drug war could have been waged primarily in overwhelmingly white suburbs or on college campuses. SWAT teams could have … raided the homes of high school lacrosse players known for hosting coke and ecstasy parties after their games. The police could have seized televisions, furniture, and cash from fraternity houses based on an anonymous tip that … a stash of cocaine could be found hidden in someone’s dresser drawer… Suburban homemakers could have been placed under surveillance and subjected to undercover operations… All of this could have happened … in white communities, but it did not. Instead, when police go looking for drugs, they look in the ‘hood.” (Pg. 155)She says, “What about gangsta rap and the culture of violence that has been embraced by so many black youth? Is there not some truth to the notion that black culture has devolved in recent years, as reflected in youth standing on the street corners … and rappers boasting about beating their ‘hos’ and going to jail? Is there not some reason to wonder whether the black community, to some extent, has lost its moral compass? The easy answer is to say yet and wag a finger at those who are behaving badly… The more difficult answer… is to say yes… we should be concerned about the behavior of men trapped in ghettoized communities, but the deep failure of morality is our own… it is helpful to step back and put the behavior of young black men who appear to embrace ‘gangsta culture’ in the proper perspective. There is absolutely nothing abnormal or surprising about a severely stigmatized group embracing their stigma… Psychologists had long observed… a powerful coping strategy… is embracing one’s stigmatized identity.” (Pg. 212-213)She asserts, “The fact that Barack Obama can give a speech … [on] the subject of fathers who are ‘AWOL’ without every acknowledging that the majority of black men in many large urban areas are currently under the control of the criminal justice system… They did not walk out on their families voluntarily; they were taken away in handcuffs, often due to a massive federal program known as the War on Drugs.” (Pg. 223)She observes, “sanctions imposed by operation of law… often have a greater impact on one’s life course than the months or years one actually spends behind bars… the vast majority of people convicted of crimes will never integrate into mainstream white society. They will be… denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Unable to surmount these obstacles, most will eventually return to prison and then released again, caught in a close circuit.” (Pg. 231)She acknowledges, “It is frequently argued in defense of mass incarceration that African Americans want more police and more prisons because crime is so bad in some ghetto communities… The argument… seems relatively straightforward, but… [has some aspects] which are quite problematic. To begin with, the argument implies that most African Americans prefer harsh criminal justice policies to other forms of governmental intervention, such as job creation, economic development… educational reform… as long-term solutions to problems associated with crime… The one thing that is clear from the survey data … is that African Americans in ghetto communities experience an intense ‘dual frustration’ regarding crime and law enforcement.’ (Pg. 258-259)Back in the New Deal era, “Although many poor African Americans rejected the … strategies of the black elite, ultimately moral uplift ideology became the new common sense… Black elites found they had much to gain by positioning themselves as ‘race managers,’ and many poor African Americans became persuaded that perhaps their degraded status was, after all, their own fault. Given this history, it should come as no surprise that today some black mayors… as well as preachers, teachers… and ordinary folk—endorse ‘get tough’ tactics and spend more time chastising the urban poor for their behavior than seeking meaningful policy solutions to the appalling conditions in which they are forced to live and raise their children.” (Pg. 266)She laments, “The economic collapse of inner-city black communities could have inspired a national outpouring of compassion and support. A new War on Poverty would have bene launched… compassion and concern could have flooded poor and working-class communities in honor of the late Martin Luther King Jr. All of this could have happened, but it didn’t. Instead, our nation declared a War on Drugs.” (Pg. 271) She proposes, “There is no path to liberation for communities of color that includes this ongoing war.” (Pg. 288)She concludes, “another generation of advocates… who know best the brutality of the new caste system.. should [be] … emboldened… by the fierce urgency of now. Those of us who hope to be their allies should not be surprised… that when those who have been locked up … finally have the chance to speak and truly be heard, what we hear is rage…. We may be tempted to control it, or doubt it… But we should do no such thing… we should do nothing more than look him in the eyes and tell him the truth.” (Pg. 324)Both thought-provoking and controversial, this book will be “must reading” for anyone concerning about current issues such as drugs, crime, etc.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  55. ReaderNix

    This system has been rigged against US for so long. The progress we have made so far, though I am thankful for it, has been minimal. It angers and saddens me at the same time how they hate us so much for no reason other than our black skin. The fight shall continue.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  56. Mark R. Brewer

    This is a powerful book. It talks about an issue that we as Americans don’t always want to confront: race. It shows how race remains a critical issue in our country today. But more importantly, it demonstrates clearly, intelligently, and successfully that the drug war in this country particularly targets minorities, especially black males. The court system imprisons black males for drug crimes, including first offenses. When white males commit these very same crimes, they go free with perhaps a fine or probation. But they don’t go to jail. But black males do, resulting in massive prison populations today. These black males are then labeled “felons.” When they get out of jail, they find it difficult to get work, they can’t vote, and they can’t qualify for housing assistance. They already have three strikes against them.I find this book so frustrating. I knew that race was still an issue. Anyone who pays attention to the news knows that. But this book has taught me that race remains a critical issue in this country. I thought we had made real progress,and perhaps we have, but THE NEW JIM CROW shows how very far we still have to go. Racism, unfortunately, is alive and well. Our court system should be ashamed.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  57. jdesenso

    Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow is a jarring, intricate look into one of the most urgent human rights crises of our time: mass incarceration. A former American Civil Liberties Union attorney and current professor of law at Ohio State University, Alexander takes on the role of scholar-insurgent in The New Jim Crow and argues for nothing less than a full interrogation of what she sees as the most “damaging manifestation of the backlash against the Civil Rights Movement” (11). This “backlash,” according to Alexander–generally understood in civil rights history common sense as the rise of a New Right–is much more insidious, racist, and systematic than previously thought. Mass incarceration, she argues, is a “tightly networked system of laws, policies, [and] institutions” that looks eerily similar to life under Jim Crow and even slavery (13). Those caught in the crosshairs of this system of (racial) social control suffer life-long, legal discrimination in housing, welfare, suffrage, employment, and health care–all of which lead to a “closed circuit of perpetual marginality” (181).Such marginality has several causes, yet she sees colorblind racial indifference and the War on Drugs as the two biggest culprits in the creation of yet another permanent racial under-caste. To make her case, Alexander pounds readers with facts, statistics, and Supreme Court rulings–the fact that “as many as 80 percent of young African American men now have criminal records” as one of many gut-checks (7). In short, Alexander’s The New Jim Crow lays bare the troubling, racist realities of the American criminal justice system. And yet, maybe due to the severity of her topic, Alexander makes occasional leaps in logic, oversimplifies at times, and even lets the pathos of the subject matter cloud her conclusions. Nevertheless, her arguments are mostly sound and ultimately make the case for a desperately needed shift in public discourse and civil rights advocacy to address the “human rights nightmare” that is mass incarceration (15).One of the most convincing parts of The New Jim Crow is the chapter entitled “The Lockdown.” With powerful detail, Alexander takes readers step-by-step along the criminal justice chain to expose how the racist War on Drugs is waged. What she calls the “Rules of the Game,” Alexander convincingly argues that the War on Drugs depends upon the erosion of Fourth Amendment rights–rights that protect privacy of person and property. Alexander threads the Supreme Court decisions of California v. Acevedo, Terry v. Ohio, and Florida v. Bostick to show that police tactics such as stop-and-frisk are protected by Supreme Court rulings. This point is not to be taken lightly, for it leads readers to understand that the state is absolutely complicit in both freeing police to round up whomever they want as well as tie the hands of citizens seeking legal recourse against discriminatory policing. This dynamic of racist state-based control, Alexander reveals, gets worse and worse as those arrested are hamstrung by unchecked prosecutorial powers, grossly inadequate public representation, mandatory minimum sentences, and perpetual “correctional supervision” if labeled felons (92). Readers are left wondering how such injustice can go on in a supposedly democratic society. Alexander is at her best here, implicating the entire institution of American justice in fewer than 50 pages.Alexander’s arguments in parts of other chapters, however, lack precision and evidence. In Chapter 4, Alexander writes: “If we actually learned to show love…and concern across racial lines during the Civil Rights Movement–rather than go colorblind–mass incarceration would not exist today” (172). Although a belief in cross-racial “love” and solidarity seems like it would remedy racial inequalities and, in a clear reach, mass incarceration, Alexander’s argument is regrettably naïve here. For one, as she demonstrates pages earlier in the same chapter, civil rights leaders and everyday folk acknowledging race or “blackness” is not something that can be easily remedied with simple effort or even love. Rather, unconscious and conscious racism is difficult to out and defeat–with the 1995 study in the Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education in Chapter 3 as one of her many examples (107). While it is helpful to recognize that racism works at the unconscious level, it’s unfair to argue that such “pre-thought” racism will go away with simple love and concern. Mass incarceration, without question, is part and parcel of a larger history of black criminalization and the racist political economy that is the US criminal justice system. In the above quote, it seems like Alexander is lost in the pathos of her subject and ignores her very own arguments from pages earlier.What is also problematic is Alexander’s assumption that love “across racial lines” was absent during the Civil Rights Movement. Aside from the fact that she provides no evidence, one can simply study the history of the civil rights movement in North Carolina or Milwaukee and discover that cross-racial concern was absolutely occurring during the civil rights movement. Now how we define “love” and “concern” may be up for debate, but to categorically frame the civil rights movement–and all conscious sympathizers–as lacking in concern and love just doesn’t hold water. It would have been much more productive for Alexander to take the civil rights movement as well as racial justice champions to task with convincing evidence. She does this to some degree in her later chapters, but her “no concern” claim unfairly lays mass incarceration at the feet of civil rights thinkers.If Alexander’s purpose is to “stimulate a conversation” and get people thinking and talking about mass incarceration, she has accomplished her goal (15). Over the past two years, in fact, Alexander has appeared on National Public Radio, Democracy Now, and C-SPAN, as well as been invited to give talks in churches, universities, bookstores, and other spaces around the country. In light of her critical embrace of the Civil Rights Movement and the apparent rise of her The New Jim Crow as perhaps a galvanizing force for justice, the popularity of her book begs a few questions: Is The New Jim Crow and similar works that centralize injustice the new frontier for a contemporary Civil Rights Movement? And is The New Jim Crow evidence enough that the Civil Rights Movement has never ended, but only recast in the realm of ideas? Alexander, of course, would argue that a movement must be more than ideas; it must also be built on love, human and racial recognition, and the full embrace of difference. For Alexander, nothing less will do. However, as she argues in her “Introduction,” racialized systems of control are “inevitable”–almost as if mass incarceration is destined to be reborn (15). Though Alexander gives ways to prevent this rebirth, such teleology, though present throughout her book, is never reconciled. In the end, we are left with a conflicted, uneasy sense of hope as the racial control telos haunts readers even after the book has been shelved.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  58. Bryan CareyBryan Carey

    Jim Crow is an ugly blemish on the American nation and while much of the repressive practices of Jim Crow have been eliminated or at least sharply curtailed, there are still active, often covert and/or conniving ways to keep minority races in their place. These underhanded means of social control and oppression are the subject of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.So, what exactly is the new Jim Crow? It is a means to control, dehumanize, repress, and ultimately destroy the lives of minorities by finding ways to target them for breaking crimes and send them off to prison. The main weapon of control is the disastrous and immoral war on drugs and this book devotes most of its pages to examining this so- called war, showing how it was devised and implemented as a way to unfairly target blacks and other minorities.This book is well- articulated and researched and some of its statistics are shocking. As I read, I often thought that the some of the stats had to be typos- they were too extreme to be true. But a quick check of sources proves them accurate. The chances of getting arrested, going to prison, and spending the rest of your life labeled as a felon are multiple times higher if your skin happens to be dark. Even if exactly the same crime is committed, a white person has exponentially greater odds of getting off easy, sometimes even having all charges dropped or the crime reduced. The disparities among different groups of people prove that the war on drugs has nothing to do with gaining control of a substance and everything to do with targeting specific groups of people.I can remember back in the 1980’s when the war on drugs was picking up steam. I was a university student at the time and we used to debate the drug war and its true motives. We all agreed that the war had nothing to do with the actual drugs- no one, not even a politician, could be so stupid to think that a war could be won against a substance. We knew there was something else going on and now that decades of data are available, the true motives have been exposed. This book does an excellent job explaining how/why the war on drugs was invented and how its proponents have been generally successful at pulling it off and making it seem like a fair, ‘colorblind’ way to deal with criminal activity.America’s racist past isn’t really in the past, as much as we want to believe. We like to think that progress has been made and, in many ways, it has, but we are far away from a truly equal and fair society. The New Jim Crow is an excellent way to learn about the new tactics embraced by the racist crowd and a call to action for everyone who wants to work toward a fair and just society.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  59. A Mama’s Hustle

    Loved this book. The storytelling from generation to generation was astonishing. The quotes from famous inspiring black individuals was spot on. Loved this book. And definitely a must read.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  60. AV

    Thank you. It arrived earlier than expected and looks great!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  61. Kindle Customer

    I thought when I purchased this book it would be an easy read, something I could read and move on to the next book on my list—not so! The book is so informative insightful and interesting. I make notes in the margin, underline passages, and highlight information so I can go back and reread it or be sure if I am quoting a statistic Ms. Alexander has brought up I think someone needs to know. Because of these quirks of mine reading this book it has taken longer than I expected but I enjoy reading it. I think of it as a text book kinda thing but a text book I want to read I want to share and tell people about. So for me this book is more than 5stars. I just wish I could get those near and dear to me to pick it up and read it. It is so packed with need to know information.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  62. L. Seducio L.

    I had hoped that I would one day write a book entitled “the Jim Crow of the North”. I was not cognizant that one would have written another book bearing such a great degree of similitude …in so many ways. If one lived in NYC during the mayoral administration from 2002-2013, he/she would certainly espoused my sentiment. A mayor who FOOLED the GULLIBLE, the NAIVE and the SIMPLETONS …oh, so easily. He did the most UNDEMOCRATIC thing I’ve ever known. He broke the municipal law, making sure he remained in office for 3 terms…12 years rather than 8. During that TORMENTOUS period, he carried out the most DEVASTATING WAVES of DISCRIMINATION and RACISM against the folks of COLOR. Nepotism was highly conspicuous. Even the most menial jobs done by those who are called Blacks and Hispanics were taken away from them and given to the HORDES of Europeans coming to the Big Apple. Furthermore, he sanctioned the police department to carry out STOP & FRISK against any human whose skin color, race and ethnicity demonstrated DIFFERENCE from his. When he left office after 12 long years, he turned around and demanded that the City Council enforce the law to ALLOW only 2 terms. By the way, his tenure as mayor started the year AFTER 911. The entire World adversely felt the DENT in World economy. The European HORDES…the MASSES came cascading towards ALL the 5 boroughs that make up NYC. Yes, the Jim Crow of the North psychologically, socially and financially DAMAGED the folks of Color. Today, NYC is really a SEA of White faces. Hmm! I still believe that when the DNC allowed him to speak at their convention, the CURSE of Heaven fell on that place and the beginning of the deterioration of the possibility of winning for this particular political party had just begun.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  63. Jeffrey Boss

    The New Jim Crow speaks to the truth within our current system. You will learn about a systematic cast system designed for failure that reeks of racial inequality and the economic disparity of the poor. While I do believe the use of the cast system that is described in this book, I find myself hoping that it is not as far-reaching and sinister as the writer presents. This may be due to just not wanting to believe that there is such evil that exists and how though our history has put racism on its back heals, it has only changed its face and approach. What is truly heartbreaking is the loss of life that is locked away and how we need to right the wrongs of the past. We can not merely sweep lives under the rug and pretend they don’t exist. This is a must-read to open our eyes so that we, as a country, can grow to a new outcome. A very in-depth book that, through becoming aware, I am now responsible and can not turn a blind eye.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  64. Kate Calina

    In Washington DC, about three out of four young black men will serve time in prison. In American cities where the War on Drugs rages, almost eighty percent of young African American men have criminal records. What do they have to look forward to once they’ve done serving time?Michelle Alexander writes with brutal intensity about life as a felon. Former prisoners “enter a hidden underworld of legalized discrimination and permanent social exclusion.” Felons lose the right to vote. They can’t apply for public housing. When they have to identify themselves as a felon on job applications, their chances of being hired are thin. With no chance for public housing and no job, their families fall victim to ongoing cycles of poverty. They are locked out of society, permanently.The New Jim Crow is a harsh call to action. Our communities are being torn apart by what is happening in the criminal justice system. There’s much that can be done. Alexander offers several solutions, like meaningful re-entry programs for felons, training and education, better drug treatment programs, and taking on the barriers to re-entering society. Like Martin Luther King, Alexander shows us that the way to hope lies in treating everyone with dignity, with the right to food, shelter, health care, education and security. What we choose to do now impacts the future for all Americans.–Kate Calina

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  65. Joseph

    I have this on my Kindle Fire but I wanted theHard copy too so I can write in the margins and highlight selected passages . I love the information coming from an expert attorney

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  66. greygran

    This book was comprehensive and succinct. It opened my eyes to so much that is behind the curtain, some things that I was guilty of as well, and didn’t realize, this should be a must read for all college students.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  67. Randall L. Wilson

    I’m a white man and I carry with me the cultural legacy of racism. I know I’m not alone but I don’t find many other white people who are willing to venture into this uncomfortable territory and own up to our own racism. And while I’ve had a few conversations about race with black men, I must say I feel like I’m venturing into dangerous territory – how do I transcend the privilege I’ve had as an socio-econonmically advantaged white man to connect to those who rightly see me and my kind as an oppressor?This was a hard book to read. I said that about “Slavery by Another Name” as well which is the companion book to this one as they both address a white power structure that uses prisons to humiliate, degrade, diminish and control black people. “Slavery by Another Name” addresses this phenomenon during Jim Crow and “The New Jim Crow” addresses how we’ve been doing this for the past thirty years.To the extent white people and non-black minorities I know talk about race, its about why blacks continue to languish at the bottom of the American barrel. If other ethnic groups that have experienced discrimination manage to overcome it and prosper as Americans, what is wrong with blacks? I’ve always said it was slavery and its legacy, the Jim Crow era and its deprivations but now I realize that the story is even more complex, black men have been disproportionately single out for prison time, causing entire families to suffer the economic loss, the social stigma and family shame that accompanies such imprisonment.I remember the O.J. trial and how whites were “shocked” that blacks had such a different take on the police and criminal justice. At the time, there was discussion about how black men were singled out for police harassment and arrest but I don’t remember a discussion about why so many black men were imprisoned. In 1995, the impact of the drug wars wasn’t fully appreciated but 15 years later with an even larger prison population, it is. The other thing about the O.J. trial that made it complicated was his role as a rich celebrity. In that regard, he took on the power and privilege of a white man and there was a sense that in his marriage to a white woman and in his lifestyle he had been escaping from his black upringing, betraying blacks. But when he stood trial, blacks hurried to support him against the white power structure.This goes to the other argument the book makes which is the way black exceptionalism, the O.Js, the Oprahs, the Michael Jackson, Tiger Woods and Obamas allow whites to believe that racism is dead, that blacks are making it, a sign that our color-blind society has triumphed. This exceptionalism hides or excuses the results of a drug war aimed directly at the black underclass and which has snatched so many black men from their families and putting them at even greater disadvantage. After prison they are marked men, making employment very difficult, voting often impossible and public housing unlikely.Class is not the subject of this book but I do think it is also at play both in terms of preserving the tense wariness poor whites feel towards any sign of “special favors” for blacks and as the lesser evil to that of racism but which has defined American life for so long and made everyone – rich and poor – look to the wealthy as successful and the poor as shameful losers.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  68. S T

    I have not read this book but I’ve heard good things about it. Ordered this particular one for a friend but the prison would not let him have it. Rerouted it to his home address. That should tell you something!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  69. Hazel M.

    Worth the money

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  70. Pinswindletin

    Absolutely essential reading for anyone who cares about social justice and racial equality in the United States. In this book Michelle Alexander clearly describes how it has come to pass that despite “colorblind” laws, we have developed a society where there is what amounts to a racialized undercaste of black and brown people, labeled as “felons” through the War on Drugs and as such subject to completely legal discrimination in housing, employment, federal assistance, and other areas, and often disenfranchised for life.Alexander shows how the war on drugs has resulted in vastly unequal outcomes by race, even though all studies show that whites and people of color use drugs at the same rates. She shows clearly through careful, logical analysis how this system operates, how it has been inoculated against legal challenge at every level (which was shocking and deeply disturbing to me) and how the lifelong effects of being caught in this dragnet never end.This book is urgently needed now more than ever. If there is any hope of healing the poisonous legacy of slavery in this country, it is imperative that this system of oppression be understood clearly, and dismantled permanently, without allowing a new version of racial control to spring up in its place.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  71. Lindsey Peterson

    The New Jim Crow is a really well-reasoned argument about the racial prejudice inherent in the criminal justice system and how this bias allows mass incarceration and the war on drugs to function as an effective system of social control, maintaining blacks, and especially poor, black men as a racial underclass.The author takes the current idea of a post-racial society and challenges all of the wisdom we now hold as true. She asserts that the ostensible ‘colorblindness’ of the criminal justice system really functions as anything but colorblind and cites various studies showing this with strong statistical evidence. The fact that the (mostly) black men affected can be said to have committed crimes is the basic reason we all feel justified in ignoring the racial prejudice in the system and its implementation. As Alexander says, “it is no longer socially permissible to use race, explicitly as a justification for discrimination, exclusion and social contempt. So we don’t. Rather than rely on race, we use our criminal justice system to label people of color “criminals” and then engage in all the practices we supposedly left behind.”We treat criminals as less than citizens, legally denying them access to jobs, housing, assistance, education, and civil rights like jury duty and voting. It is perfectly acceptable to treat them as such because we tell ourselves that they had a choice in becoming criminals. They didn’t have to commit the crime. This is a false argument. Someone doing something illegal doesn’t mean that they cannot be treated unjustly or that the system can no longer fail to produce an equitable outcome for them. A criminal is no less likely to be a victim of racial prejudice than a model citizen.”The temptation is to insist that black men “choose” to be criminals; the system does not make them criminals, at least not in the way that slavery made blacks slaves or Jim Crow made them second-class citizens. The myth of choice here is seductive, but it should be resisted. African Americans are not significantly more likely to use or sell prohibited drugs than whites, but they are made criminals at drastically higher rates for precisely the same conduct. In fact, studies suggest that white professionals may be the most likely of any group to have engaged in illegal drug activity in their lifetime, yet they are the least likely to be made criminals. The prevalence of illegal drug activity among all racial and ethnic groups creates a situation in which, due to limited law enforcement resources and political constraints, some people are made criminals while others are not. Black people have been made criminals by the War on Drugs to a degree that dwarfs its effect on other racial and ethnic groups, especially whites. And the process of making them criminals has produced racial stigma.”Additionally, our criminal justice system is now based mostly on the prosecution of drug-related offenses. The majority of felons behind bars are there for drugs – using, dealing, smuggling, trafficking, etc. The thing about the War on Drugs is that it is conducted in a manner that specifically targets low income black neighborhoods, rather than middle and high income white neighborhoods where the crimes are just as likely to happen, albeit in lower population density. “Studies show that people of all colors use and sell illegal drugs at remarkably similar rates. If there are significant differences in the surveys to be found, they frequently suggest that whites, particularly white youth, are more likely to engage in drug crime than people of color… In some states, black men have been admitted to prison on drug charges at rates twenty to fifty times greater than those of white men.” In some major cities, “as many as 80 percent of young African American men” have done jail time and are now considered criminals and are subject to the post-incarceration sanctions that keep them as a permanent underclass.Another interesting part of the War on Drugs, is that not all felons are ineligible for public assitance, often, just drug felons, which taken with the image of the ‘welfare queen’ can pretty well illustrate what we think of blacks, and that the entire operation is at the very least related to racial motives.”What is key to America’s understanding of class is the persistent belief-despite all evidence to the contrary-that anyone, with the proper discipline and drive, can move from a lower class to a higher class. We recognize that mobility may be difficult, but the key to our collective self-image is the assumption that mobility is always possible, so failure to move up reflects on one’s character. By extension, the failure of a race or ethnic group to move up reflects very poorly on the group as a whole.”We convince ourselves that we are giving minorities enough of a chance to move up by barring explicit discrimination against them for reasons of color and by providing them with access to top schools through affirmative action, but this really does nothing to improve the station of the vast majority of minority citizens.It is ‘trickle-down theory of justice’. “Affirmative action, particularly when it is justified on the grounds of diversity rather than equity (or remedy), masks the severity of racial inequality in America, leading to greatly exaggerated claims of racial progress and overly optimistic assments of the future for African Americans.” We see the exceptions doing well, people like Oprah and President Obama, and think that if black people can get there, they can get anywhere they want to, and they don’t because they either don’t want to be there or don’t want to work hard enough to be there. We don’t think about the way that the world is stacked against them to begin with. And the worst part is that almost everyone complicit in this doesn’t even realize that they’re complicit. You don’t think about it because you don’t see it or you think it doesn’t affect you.If you haven’t committed a crime or had anyone close to you commit a crime, you don’t see the racial disparities in sentencing, plea bargaining, access to representation, access to a jury trial, etc. There are disparities all the way down. White defendants are more likely to be allowed to plead guilty to a misdemeanor offense. They’re more likely to have privately engaged counsel rather than an overworked public defender. And they’re less likely to be sentenced to life in prison than blacks. One of the strongest arguments for racial bias in sentencing comes from the Baldus study, which found that”defendants charged with killing white victims received the death penalty eleven times more often than defendants charged with killing black victims. Georgia prosecutors… sought the death penalty in 70 percent of cases involving black defendants and white victims, but only 19 percent of cases involving white defendants and black victims… after accounting for thirty-five nonracial variables, the researchers found that defendants charged with killing white victims were 4.3 times more likely to receive a death sentence than defendants charged with killing blacks.”The arguments in this book clearly have carried me, and I feel I’ve gained a lot by reading it. I’d recommend it to anyone who is interested in learning a bit more about racial justice, even if they don’t share my opinion. They can see the studies she references and judge the sources for themselves.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  72. Tony Mirabel

    Alexander uses both her experience and scholarship to disect the illusion of a Free and just America. Alexander brilliantly makes comparisons from brick and mortar prisons to digital prisons ( ankle bracelets and other monitoring devices), which has emerged as a new cost effecient and oppressive command and control over black men. Alexander includes the adverse effects this has on black women and children and how black women and children are regulated to 2nd class citenziship in the country they are birthed in. Alexander reveals the inequity of the criminal justice system as a cause of black men being arrested and convicted of petty crimes at 10 times the rate of their white counterpart. Alexander closes by offering hope for an egalitarian society through a combination of coalition activists and the uniting of the races. This book is short and powerful. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is trying to make a male sense of the resurge of racism in America.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  73. Roamie Roam

    Have your children read please!!!!!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  74. G. B.

    A second reading of the New Jim Crow only strengthens Michelle Alexander’s compelling argument that systemic bias is built into our public policy process to incarcerate and disenfranchise the poor, but obviously focused on the young black male. It’s a hard argument to accept, but Alexander’s precise, well documented and reasoned treatise makes it impossible to refute. The tragic cost in the potential for our society makes one wonder why policy makers and the media have been so silent. Could it be that they are complicit in this charade?I came to this book after seeing Alexander on Bill Moyers and, to be honest, found many of her arguments and conclusions to be weird to looney. But I decided to give her book a try and it has stayed with me ever since. I must explain, as a 50 year old middle class male with a nebulous ethic categorization, one who has never even known anyone who has served time, I have never had an interest nor even awareness of this issue. It should seemingly be unimportant to me. But as Alexander makes clear, this is my fight too.Alexander does a masterful job, among many, of tying the incentive to local law eforcement federal funding to the war on drugs and how it both skews priorities and public perception to believe there is far more crime than really exists. And of course, there has to be a culprit–usually, but not always, a young black male–and there has to be a system in place to deal with this “danger to society.” (sarcasm intended The policies are built on the acceptance of misinformation, the failure of law enforcement, a judiciary that feeds the prison system, and a public/private partnership that thrives on a steady supply of inmates. It is an argument that at first seems too simplistic until you give this book the time and attention it deserves. By the time I had finished my second reading, I fail to understand why we, as a nation, ignore this. Race obviously is the underlying reason. That, combined with intellectual laziness probably accounts for most of the situation.When taken together with David Cay Johnston’s argument in Free Lunch that the home security industry, which provides little that citizens and communities don’t already do themselves, has in interest in making people feel insecure, it is easy to mesh Alexander’s case together to produce a plausible outcome. We have mostly groundless fears, an industry that benefits from state and local public resources maintains a climate of fear to continue to make profits, public policy largely uses the war on drugs as a pretext for making that unfounded fear worse, and poor, young, black males make a perfect scapegoat.Those of us who have given up on Obama can look back on this issue as another reason we are disgusted with this administration. Rather than use the bully pulpit to take Alexander’s argument and educate the American people, it is ignored. Instead deportations have become vogue and quietly the political and commericial interests in maintaining the war on drugs are becoming the dominant voices at the Department of Justice and other federal agencies. Instead we are losing generations of citizens needlessly, diverting massive public resources and talents, and repeating the mistakes of the past again. Truly heartbreaking. And the lagniappe (that little something extra) for the Republican Party? Disenfranchising, in some cases permanently, voters who are largely inclined to vote for Republican opponents.This may be the most haunting of all public policy books you will ever read.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  75. Amy Williams

    thank you for opening my eyes to deeply laid injustices the depth of which i didn’t understand. I will promote and share this book with my family, friends and neighbors.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  76. Baseball Fan

    Ms. Alexander puts the spotlight on a massive racial undercast in the United States – mass incarceration, mainly of people of color (African Americans, Latinos). She postulates that mass incarceration has been created (and is perpetuated) mainly via the War on Drugs which is administered by a racially biased criminal justice system (judges, prosecutors, police). Ms. Alexander defines mass incarceration as encompassing all means for keeping this racial undercast under correctional control (prison/jail, probation, parole) in order to maintain racial hierarchy. And she supports her in-depth analysis by referencing several key Supreme Court cases/rulings, and describing how they have exacerbated mass incarceration of people of color. Ms. Alexander indicates that her book is intended to stimulate a conversation about the new Jim Crow; and she advocates that “all those who care about social justice should fully commit themselves to dismantling the new racial caste system.”

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  77. Barbara Frederick

    The facts are there, but the impact is astounding. Our criminal justice system is discussed as “broken” in the mass media, but I had no idea just how bad it is until I read this book. I did not know there were so many people willing to take jobs participating in such cruel injustice. But then I remember that I used to work for a Superior Court, and never really looked at what happened to those who came before the judge. The reality is even worse, as very few people even get a trial, but plead guilty to avoid the worst sentences with which they are threatened. I can’t help thinking the reason we don’t really know what goes on is summed up in the title: Jim Crow refers to black people, and if you’re not black, you probably don’t have occasion to think about the extreme disproportionate effects the criminal “justice” system has in other people’s lives.But it is a blunt fact that Black Lives Matter. We must not only read this book, we must take action against injustice. Ferguson may be just a couple of miles up the road for me, but it’s really everywhere. Jim Crow is no longer just a southern problem.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  78. Bert J. Debusschere

    In her book, “The New Jim Crow”, civil rights lawyer, advocate, and legal scholar Michelle Alexander makes the case that the “war on drugs” since its launch in the early eighties has resulted in a new system of racial control in the US. In this system, young black men are disproportionately incarcerated for drug offences, which marks them as felons and subjects them to many life-long forms of legal discrimination. The war on drugs effectively relegates many black and brown men to a lower racial caste in society, similar to slavery and the Jim Crow era in the past. As such, mass incarceration has given rise to a New Jim Crow era.Based on numerous facts and studies quoted in the book, mass incarceration as a result of the war on drugs has taken on enormous proportions. “In less than thirty years, the U.S. penal population exploded from around 300,000 to more than 2 million, with drug convictions accounting for the majority of the increase.” “The racial dimension of mass incarceration is its most striking feature. No other country in the world imprisons so many of its racial or ethnic minorities.” “Studies show that people of all colors use and sell illegal drugs at remarkably similar rates.” However, “in some states, black men have been admitted to prison on drug charges at rates twenty to fifty times greater than those of white men. And in major cities wracked by the drug war, as many as 80 percent of young African American men now have criminal records and are thus subject to legalized discrimination for the rest of their lives.”With great clarity and detail, the author outlines the various elements that turned the war on drugs into an effective system of racial control, from the motivations and tactics used by police forces in drug arrests, and the way the U.S. criminal justice system is structured to lead to discrimination against people of color, to the legal discrimination of people labeled as felons after their time in prison.The book also analyzes the similarities and differences between mass incarceration, the Jim Crow era, and slavery, each in their own historical context. Based on this analysis, Michelle Alexander argues that the current trend towards colorblindness in society is one of the root causes for the racial caste system resulting from the war on drugs. From this point of view, the author takes a critical look at the current legislative focus of many civil rights efforts and issues a call to action to better address the underlying causes of racial control systems.The book is well written and organized, with a target audience of “people who care deeply about racial justice but who, for any number of reasons, do not yet appreciate the magnitude of the crisis faced by communities of color as a result of mass incarceration.” Considering myself part of this target audience, I can say that the book indeed opened my eyes to the system of mass incarceration with its many implications for people of color, and gave me many new points of view from which to approach this phenomenon.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  79. Thomas R. Bodenlos

    This book makes the case that laws have been written and enforced unevenly to the detriment of people of color. In particular it looks at the level of incarceration of people of color in comparison to whites particularly in the case of drugs where for the same levels of possession people of color have been more commonly incarcerated (for longer terms too) than whites as a percentage of their overall population when whites possess drugs generally at the same levels as people of color. How incarceration leads systemic issues of unemployment,poverty and disenfranchisement at the ballot box.It is good that several states are working to correct some injustices, such as dealing with disenfranchisement, but as we can see in Florida where the state’s government have been working to throw up roadblocks to keep ex felons from voting contrary to what the citizens’ vote in that state in 2018 to allow them that right.There are many issues of government policy examined in this book that should be rewritten or eliminated where laws have shown themselves to be overwhelmingly applied to people of color. Where anomalies are observed in incarceration, conviction or charges; our politicians,police, attorney generals should ask the questions of is the law written in an evenhanded way? Is enforcement done evenly instead of focusing on ‘certain neighborhoods’? Are prosecutions handled in a way that is color blind to making sure juries are ethnically diverse and consistently performed. During our current time of Black Lives Matter we have seen many examples of police not applying law equally to people of color.This book provides a number of issues that should be examined and corrected in our society. For those still curious to know if our justice system is colorblind this book should help to to answer that question.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  80. Catherine

    Michelle’s writing style is a bit stilted and she repeats key points multiple times in the different chapters. It is almost as if the chapters were each written in a standalone fashion rather than a building block approach. However the story she tells is so compelling that I would not let that deter anyone. Her work as an attorney has paid off. She digs deep into each chapter of the history and results of the mass incarceration this country is undergoing. Alternating between anger and sadness, I was nevertheless completely gob smacked by just how bad the issue is. If you care about social justice, if you care about have a society that has “equal justice’ for all, then you must read this book.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  81. G. Gensbygel

    A very disturbing, very well researched book: Michelle Alexander paints a convincing portrait of the dire plight of African-Americans, in their struggle finally to become equals in a society that thrives on the lack of equality. Point for point shows how the conscious and unconscious bias of the majority in this country works against the true emancipation of African-Americans, Latinos, and other minorities. The whole attitude of the law enforcing machine is shown as being sick, biased and racist, and at the bottom of it is the inhumanitarian view as incarceration as “punishment”, rather than rehabilitation. She clearly shows how the “war on drugs” is, in fact, a war on the minorities, mainly African-Americans and Latinos, how the struggle for political power infuses the need to “appear tough on crime”, without being concerned about the destruction of families, lives, and society, and without being concerned about the root causes for crime: poverty, inequality, prejudice, racism, greed, and rampant materialism. This excellent book also gives a chilling warning about the long-term implications of the rabid politics of mass incarceration, namely the marginalization of the minorities, which opens the door to the abuse of power for everyone: all it needs is an unscrupulous clique of power-hungry politicians to use the already existing laws to clamp down on everyone, to establish a full-blown fascist police state, where the only “freedom” left would be to pay taxes and die in ever more mad wars. I recommend this book to anybody who is concerned about the incredible erosion of Human Rights in the USA: the people who scream loudest about the government “controlling too much” (their money), and who applaud the fact that the government destroys the personal freedom and the rights of human beings to the pursuit of happiness because of the colour of their skins.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  82. Darshling

    This is a really good book. It explains things very well about how our past and current system operates as a system of racial control. It is very eye opening, infuriating, and saddening. It really helps you understand how things got to be the way they are. I would recommend this book for anyone going into the field of criminal justice or working with juveniles (even though this book doesn’t really focus on them, I think it could be useful and provide a sense of understanding for many people). I personally loathe history lessons, but this is presented in a way where the material is not boring, but very informative. If you’re an American, you should read this book.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  83. R N M

    This book is so well done. As an immigrant I’m still learning the history of America. I finally understood the origins of the war on drugs and how it can be traced to slavery, reconstruction, segregation, civil rights movement. This is the history that republicans don’t want taught in schools because it’s ugly and shocking. The sad thing is, the more things change, the more they stay the same.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  84. vinylshark

    Michelle Alexander has created a book with such scope about the link between the drug war, mass incarceration, and race that anyone with questions on these issues can’t help but “get it” after reading. Meticulous and suggesting hundreds if new avenues for further reading and discovery this is one of THOSE books that will become a cornerstone in a movement to name and end the new racial cast system.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  85. S. OSullivan

    This book is an important and beneficial contribution to US history, a must-read for every American citizen. Dr. Alexander brilliantly describes the current state of incarceration, and the misconceptions about it that permeate our society–a false narrative deliberately fostered by those who benefit from it.Furthermore, the book clearly demonstrates how this situation came about, and why, backed up by years of research; at every turn the author foresees possible questions or arguments, and addresses them with understanding as well as a clear explanation based on hard, unequivocal data.It is a book that lays bare uncomfortable, even shocking truths without preaching–but also without providing any excuses to justify inaction.The only conclusion left for the reader is that our society is deeply rooted in injustice, and requires substantial change.I hope that as a country, we are brave enough to accept the truth, and our collective responsibility, as it is so brilliantly presented in this book.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  86. Advocate for the marginalized

    this book is a MUST READ and i’ve never said that about any other book. The New Jim Crow is so informative and illuminating; just puts so much in perspective. stuff that you’ve heard, thought about, sub consciously thought possible, Ms. Alexander puts it out there with empirical evidence for EVERY ONE of her statements. it’s amazing how the whole system of ‘mass incarceration’ was rigged (so to speak) from the beginning (even tho sub consciously we knew). The Supreme Court bought in early on the whole ‘war on drugs’ fiasco and continued to reinforce this maniacal system of incarcerating Black people – our men in particular – which relates to today and all the killings of unarmed black men and the murderers (the police) who are sanctioned by the system and put on a paid vacation, so to speak , AND how the civil rights community is ‘strangely quiet’ – strange indeed. Ms. Alexander cites authors/luminaries like Lani Guinier – who has been an intellect, social justice advocate and my hero since bill clinton days. it was truly disheartening and inspiring (cause it manifested and validated our feelings, put a name to it) at the same time. the way Ms. Alexander expounds on the affect this war on black people had on the African American community – the shame, humiliation, families torn apart. ‘the system of mass incarceration is based on the prison label, not prison time” sums up the injustices and how after being released from prison the person is really relegated to slave status – can’t vote, no jobs, no social service, in her words – ‘legalized discrimination and permanent social exclusion’. “WE HAVE NOT ENDED RACIAL CAST IN AMERICA; WE HAVE MERELY REDESIGNED IT”.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  87. Grandma Runninghorse

    I love this book. It is well researched, and documented. Ms. Alexander has done a wonderful job updating her book, and keeping it current. The thesis presented here still hold after a number of years since first published. The topic and discussion is very relevant to today’s world and the possible answers to the problem continue to need to be worked on and accomplished.Dr Marin Luther Kong’s crusade for civil rights is still alive and his words along with many other black authors need to be heeded.Thank you Michelle Alexander for this book!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  88. A bookish reader

    Rarely does a book come along that challenges your way of looking at things, informs you and galvanizes you. This is one of those books.I was blown away from the first page. The author posits her seemingly controversial theory boldly and without apology. It is simply this: that the “War on Drugs” and mass incarceration is functioning as a means of social control that is the next generation of Jim Crow laws. When I first read it, I thought she was being a little over the top. (In fact, the author tells a story that when she first saw a similar statement on a poster, she thought it was a bit much too). By the end of the book, she had made me a believer.She presents you with fact after fact and study after stud that builds a devastating case. After each point she makes, you think, “Yes, but…” (such as, “Yes, but the Fourth Amendment prevents illegal search and seizure”) but then she refutes every objection you have. It is extremely well-researched, comprehensive and insightful.This is the book that will inform our civil rights conversations for the next 20 years. It is a game-changer, a seminal work in this area. I’m letting everyone I know to become acquainted with it because they will be hearing about its theories for a long time.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  89. RoyalBlacksince86

    As someone who has family and friends that have been and are caught up in the prison/jail system. This has been an enlightening read.Some of the information in this book I’ve always had a sense about but couldn’t put into words. Now I can ..powerful book!!! If I could give it more stars Iwould. Highly recommended to anyone who wants to understand the justice system and how it truly works

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  90. johnny green

    Just want to know what was not teach in school

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this

    Add a review

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
    The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

    $10.15

    EqualityDesk
    Logo
    Compare items
    • Total (0)
    Compare
    0
    Shopping cart