When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work.

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BICKERING. BACK BITING. CLASHING. COLLIDING.
JUST ANOTHER DAY AT THE OFFICE…

In case your office typically appears like a battlefield and your colleagues typically look like aliens, you aren’t alone. At this time there are 4 distinct generations of staff obvious at each other from throughout the convention desk, and the potential for battle and confusion has by no means been better.

On this insightful, charming e book, generational specialists Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman shed much-needed mild on tips on how to bridge generational gaps at work by understanding the variations that drive generations aside.

Traditionalist staff with their “heads down, onward and upward” perspective reside out a piece ethic that was formed throughout the darkish days of the Nice Melancholy. In the meantime, the eighty million Child Boomers are at a crossroads, attempting to steadiness their overwhelming must succeed with their need to decelerate and benefit from the fruits of their labor. They alternate between admiration and abhorrence for the chutzpah demonstrated by Technology Xers, who, along with feeling as in the event that they need to show themselves continually, are chafing below the picture of being overly formidable, disrespectful, and irreverent. Nipping at everybody’s heels are the brand new youngsters on the block, the Millennials — with their distinctive mixture of savvy and social conscience, they promise to vary but once more the panorama of the office.

Whether or not you are a supervisor, an worker, an entrepreneur, or a talented skilled, you may derive hands-on, take-home enterprise advantages from understanding this important type of range affecting right now’s high-performance office.

Utilizing a wry and sensible method to bottom-line enterprise points and drawing upon interviews, experiences, and the findings from their nationwide survey, Lancaster and Stillman provide you with in-depth insights into every era. With their assist, you may have the instruments you must recruit, retain, encourage, and handle every era extra successfully. And you will acknowledge that whereas -collisions are inevitable, in the end it is how we handle them that counts.

Specification: When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work.

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25 reviews for When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work.

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  1. Vikki Weiss

    When a friend recommended this book, I was skeptical. After all, I do freelance work and am not concerned with most workplace issues. However, I found it to be a real page-turner. It is well-written, informative, and amusing. When Generations Collide contains insights that are helpful in all aspects of life from relating to older family members to hiring the right child care provider. You would be doing yourself a disservice by not reading this book.

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  2. Dee Arr

    I admit, this book had me right from the beginning, and I am talking about the Foreward and the Introduction sections. The book dives right in by identifying the issue, that there are major differences between the generations (Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millenials). Each has a different version of success as well as a desire to be rewarded in different ways. Small wonder that companies are scratching their heads and wondering why past solutions no longer seem to work.Having two different generations (Baby Boomer and Gen-X) as authors is a good start in the writers understand the difficulty of most of us as we grapple with this issue. Whether you are at the top of a company or merely trying to co-exist with other generations in a large office space, there is a mountain of information in this book that will help you understand the hows and whys of today’s workplaces. The good news is that it doesn’t appear to be that hard. One merely needs to have the desire to learn about the other generations and then be willing to work together (or perhaps it is the “Cusper” designation I embrace, which is a bridge between Baby Boomers and Gen-Xers).No matter where you stand now, authors Lynne Lancaster and David Stillman offer full explanations of the various generations as well as what they call the Clashpoints (the collision spots where generational thought bang together). Their conversational style of writing helps, and one almost experiences the feeling of a casual discussion with a good friend offering helpful hints. This makes the book a fast read, one I found myself pausing only to highlight the important passages (meaning after the first read, my Kindle is exploding with colors).The authors have thoughtfully provided a couple of sections at the end I found extremely helpful. The first is a long bibliography of additional information. The extensive list of Searchable Terms will certainly be a great aid and save me time – I will be able to easily find the information I need without flipping through the book’s pages.Recommended for executives, workers, parents, etc. – anyone who has contact with others belonging to any of the generations, especially if you find it difficult to understand why those generations don’t think like you do. Five stars.

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  3. Teri Bloomquist

    Terrific!!! Informative, Amusing, and Very Easy Reading.I have recommended “Generations” to everyone at work. Those who are able to work together, may be able to survive together. Professional survival is critical in the Bay Area; and I will use any edge I can.Essential reading!!!

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  4. D. K. Parshall

    I found this book to be very informative and readable. The book gives a number of good insights about the different values of four generations in the workplace today. There are lots of examples and solutions to making the workplace more productive and fun. Unfortunately, the book’s focus is on business, making money and working together better. Guess that’s what pays the bills. I guess the insights can help in relationships throughout society but for those who are looking for answers outside of business this might be a hard read to get through.

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  5. Amazon Customer

    Now I can understand why my 13-year old wanted her own PDA for her 13th birthday while I was perfectly content watching a Beatles movie when I turned 13 years old!I have just finished reading this book from cover to cover and found it to be extremely engaging, funny, informative and invaluable. I recently saw Lancaster and Stillman speak and was intrigued watching them in action– as business partners, authors and great friends. Their partnership is clearly the selling point and the foundation in which I have appreciated this book. They are both funny, smart and very passionate about this topic.This book is extremely well written with strong content, relevant research and personal anecdotes. My favorite area has been the specific ClashPoints they have identified and explain each from the 4 generational points of views. Right on!This book is a must-read for high level executives in Corporate America who need to better understand how to recruit, manage, develop and retain a diverse workforce. It should also be on every parent’s nightstand as they learn to balance the needs and expectations of their aging parents and their growing children.

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  6. Elizabeth A Miller

    This book belongs in every office, university, high school and home for a clearer understanding of the generations. It is an easy book to read, and reference…best of all entertaining and fun for a business book. Very educational on a professional and personal level. I highly recommend it.Beth MillerGolf Instructor

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  7. Frank S

    an informative, enjoyable book

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  8. Dr. F. G. Turner

    For the first time in the U.S. history, we have four separate generations working side-by-side. They are the Traditionalists, Baby boomers, Gen Xers and Gen Y. While there is really no magic birth date that makes one a member of a specific generation, one’s experience and sharing of history helps shape a `generational personality’ during their formative years. This is a must-read book as `one-size’ does not fit each generation’s needs in terms of benefits, working hours, places of employment, methods of training/motivation and retention. With four generations in the work system, misunderstandings happen. Additionally, progressive organizations are realizing they need to develop new recruiting procedures, create new compensation,benefit and retention strategies to attract and retain the best of the four diverse groups in the work system. When generational collisions occur, it results in reduced profitability, presents hiring challenges, increased turnover rates, and decreased morale. Understanding the various generational identities will help in building bridges in the work environment. The book authors, Lancaster and Stillman, describe for the reader the four generational personalities and provide suggestions regarding rewards/retention/motivatational techniques that appeal to each generation. Briefly, the four generations are defined:Traditionalists were born between the turn of the last century and the end of World War II (1900-1945) and they number about 5M in population. The Traditionalists were impacted by two World Wars and the Great Depression. They learned to do without and the management style they learned came from the military – a top-down, boot-camp method. They were cautious, obedient. and spoke when spoken to. They would have never called their boss by `his’ first name. For years they had career security of life-long employment opportunities so all the downsizing of the 80s/90s initially took them by shock. They have their own preference regarding rewards and respond to different recruiting messages.Baby Boomers: (Born from 1946-1964) represents the largest population ever born in the U.S. Their large number of about 80M created a competitive nature among them for jobs/opportunities. For the most part, they grew up in suburbs, had educational opportunities above their parents, saw lots of consumer products hit the marketplace (calculators, appliances). The television had a significant impact on their views of the world regarding equal opportunity and other human rights. They represent a great recruiting target as they `retool’ for new career opportunities for those recruiters who have the knowledge on how to attract them. Generation X: Many members of the Generation X emerged into the workplace during the 1990s expansion and this is the smallest generation in terms of numbers (46M- due to birth control and working moms). They had a distinct competitive advantage in choice jobs `they wanted.’ The technological revolution exacerbated their successes as they are techno savvy unlike their Boomer competitors. Rather than `paying their dues for a number of years’ as previous generations did, they were able to demand that organizations adapt to their ways of doing things creating disbelief from the Traditionalist/Boomers. (Actually, the Gen Xers have made the work place a better system for all of us by demanding flex hours, telecommuting, etc). Gen Xers grew up a skeptical group due to fractured family systems, violence in the news, AIDS, drugs, child molsters and downsizings. Generation Xers are dash board diners and being latchkey kids taught them independence. They detest micro-management in the work environment and want constant feedback on how they are performing. Recruiters and HR personnel need specifics to attract, motivate and retain Gen Xers.Gen Y/ Millennial Generation: This 75M techno-savvy, multi-tasking generation has had access to cell phones, personal pagers, and computers most of their life. They have, for the most part, led privileged lives traveling more than previous generations to world wide areas, growing up in `fun’ day care programs/activities, owning the best in technology and being included in family collaborations that involve major issues ranging from where to live, the decorations in their bedroom to vacation trips. Their parents/teachers have coached them to build extensive portfolios (for college), therefore, they will most likely be portfolio conscious and looking for career expansion opportunities. Futurists predict they will change jobs 7-10 times and even change careers 2 or 3 times. They were also taught to question parents/teachers and the status quo. They have served in school peer-court systems having a say in major decisions and this will impact how they will respond and adapt within workplace system. The authors provide some specific recruiting/retention strategies to attract this generation. Looking at the workplace as a system, these generational variances present recruiting, rewarding and retention challenges. Employee turnover eats up management hours and dollars spent advertising and conducting searches for, interviewing, hiring and training new recruits. Its takes up remaining employees’ time covering open positions. It frustrates customers who often receive substandard or inconsistent service.

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  9. Dee Arr

    I admit, this book had me right from the beginning, and I am talking about the Foreward and the Introduction sections. The book dives right in by identifying the issue, that there are major differences between the generations (Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millenials). Each has a different version of success as well as a desire to be rewarded in different ways. Small wonder that companies are scratching their heads and wondering why past solutions no longer seem to work.Having two different generations (Baby Boomer and Gen-X) as authors is a good start in the writers understand the difficulty of most of us as we grapple with this issue. Whether you are at the top of a company or merely trying to co-exist with other generations in a large office space, there is a mountain of information in this book that will help you understand the hows and whys of today’s workplaces. The good news is that it doesn’t appear to be that hard. One merely needs to have the desire to learn about the other generations and then be willing to work together (or perhaps it is the “Cusper” designation I embrace, which is a bridge between Baby Boomers and Gen-Xers).No matter where you stand now, authors Lynne Lancaster and David Stillman offer full explanations of the various generations as well as what they call the Clashpoints (the collision spots where generational thought bang together). Their conversational style of writing helps, and one almost experiences the feeling of a casual discussion with a good friend offering helpful hints. This makes the book a fast read, one I found myself pausing only to highlight the important passages (meaning after the first read, my Kindle is exploding with colors).The authors have thoughtfully provided a couple of sections at the end I found extremely helpful. The first is a long bibliography of additional information. The extensive list of Searchable Terms will certainly be a great aid and save me time – I will be able to easily find the information I need without flipping through the book’s pages.Recommended for executives, workers, parents, etc. – anyone who has contact with others belonging to any of the generations, especially if you find it difficult to understand why those generations don’t think like you do. Five stars.

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  10. kay troutt

    interesting topic. well thought out material in the book.

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  11. Teri Danahey

    The authors have a great way of explaining the sometimes pain of working with different generations. Humorous and yet valuable stories illustrate how the generations differ, why each has a tremendous contribution to make and, most importantly, how to maximize the potential / productivity of each group. Most encouraging are the Millenials — our youngest group — who just may save the world. Hats off to Lynne Lancaster and David Stillman for bringing this topic to life. It’s the best business book I’ve read in years.

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  12. Susan

    Excellent book about generation gaps! Must read for all managers and supervisors who have three or four generations in their workplace.

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  13. Aaron

    Do you want a book that will change your work life? This is the book for you. You will discover how understanding the different generations that are in the workplace can help you communicate, motivate, and get along with others. If you are a Gen x’er who managers boomers, this is a must read for you!

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  14. Irina

    got it in good condition, a good read

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  15. Catherine

    I saw David Stillman speak and was fascinated by his insight on how the generations are struggling to work together. It really gave me a greater understanding of my 20 year old son, what influenced him and where some of his priorities came from. The theories are spot on and the examples are amazing. This is a great read for an open-minded parent who really cares what his/her child is really thinking about. Also helps with understanding and appreciating our parents. Not just about workplace issues, incorporates life experiences and insights.

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  16. Aaron

    Do you want a book that will change your work life? This is the book for you. You will discover how understanding the different generations that are in the workplace can help you communicate, motivate, and get along with others. If you are a Gen x’er who managers boomers, this is a must read for you!

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  17. Eduard Klink Logeman

    Great Product as descibed….fast delivery

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  18. MES

    This has been very enlightning to look outside one’s own generation. Awareness is half the battle. Excellent resource.

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  19. J. Lindner

    Anyone who has managed people from different generations can relate to the notion that different generations prompt people to have different ideas about how the world works. That may be a given, but when it rests on a manager’s shoulders to keep the team productive or on course with corporate goals, having insight into the component members’ behaviors is a very useful tool. I’ve managed the generation born during World War Two, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and my kids represent the Millenial generation. Believe me, there are distinct differences.This book attempts to catagorize generations, not to promote stereotypes and to put people in boxes, but to highlight how common experiences can mold people. True, there are socio-economic differences (I am in the same generation as Caroline Kennedy, but aside from that our experiences are vastly different), but being in the same age group does create bonds among people. Values change over time and those values are what shapes people’s ways of thinking.The manager’s job is to manage; to get the work done given the employees at hand. If we could pick our own teams we may not select those people we have on staff, but aside from professional sports teams, most managers can be more or less stuck with what they got. The manager is expected to make the best of things. If the manager can’t do this, it’s easier for the company to find one who can.Lancaster and Stillman present an interesting argument in how generations are defined, and what their expectations of careers are. The savvy manager will read a book like this with an open mind and use the information presented herein to learn to work with staff for the mutual benefit of all involved. Of course not all managers are savvy, or even very intelligent. Those who could benefit most from a book like this will probably never read it. But then again not all companies are successful in developing people and market strategies. These companies may not be around to get a second chance at success.This book is well thought out and well presented. Some of the chapters, such as the chapter on rewarding employees may be a bit off the mark, but that doesn’t hurt the overall message coming from this book: understand your staff and learn what makes them tick. Your company will benefit.

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  20. steve

    I teach and write papers on Generational Recruiting. This book has many excellent conclusions and is well thought out. A recommended buy for those who manage.

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  21. Fritz Reese

    I believe it is a very important topic in the work place and one that should be paid more attention to. However, I didn’t think they broke any new ground.

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  22. Scott Meyer

    “When Generations Collide” is going to become required reading at my firm. David and Lynne’s contribution to understanding human differences ultimately will be as important to improving communication and collaboration as the Myers-Briggs research. It is absolutely amazing how generational differences get in the way of people being able to get along and understand each other. This book provides a lasting advantage to its readers.

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  23. steve

    I teach and write papers on Generational Recruiting. This book has many excellent conclusions and is well thought out. A recommended buy for those who manage.

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  24. Robert A.

    This book looks at the various generations and offers invaluable perspectives about their significant attitudes and the reasons for their differing world views. It should be a must read for managers and leaders who are working or volunteering in a multi-generational environment.Absolutely recommend!

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  25. Sean Zimny

    Pioneering on the subject

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    When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work.
    When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work.

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