The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias: How To Reframe Bias, Cultivate Connection, and Create High-Performing Teams

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A “profound” (Cynt Marshall, CEO of the Dallas Mavericks), well timed, must-have information to understanding and overcoming bias within the office from the specialists at FranklinCovey.

Unconscious bias impacts everybody. It could actually appear like the frustration of an HR skilled when a candidate for a brand new place asks about maternity go away. It could actually appear like preferring the appliance of an Ivy League graduate over one from a state college. It could actually appear like assuming a person is extra entitled to talk in a gathering than his feminine junior colleague.

Ultimate for each supervisor who needs to know and transfer previous their very own preconceived concepts, The Chief’s Information to Unconscious Bias is a “must-read” (Sylvia Acevedo, CEO, rocket scientist, STEM chief, and creator) that explains that bias is the results of psychological shortcuts, our likes and dislikes, and is a pure a part of the human situation. And what we assume about one another and the way we work together with each other has huge results on our organizational success—particularly within the office. This ebook teaches you the best way to overcome unconscious bias and gives greater than thirty distinctive instruments, similar to a prep worksheet and an inventory of the way to reframe your unconscious ideas.

In keeping with the specialists at FranklinCovey, your office can obtain its highest efficiency charge when you begin to overcome your biases and permit your staff to be entire individuals. By recognizing bias, emphasizing empathy and curiosity, and making true understanding a precedence within the office, we are able to unlock the potential of each particular person we encounter.

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44 reviews for The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias: How To Reframe Bias, Cultivate Connection, and Create High-Performing Teams

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  1. BriBri

    We hear a lot about unconscious bias, and by “a lot” what I really mean is as much as can be fit into a required 30-60 minute training course from HR. There is SO MUCH to learn and unpack on the topic, and this book does it all. In easily digestible chapters, you get real life stories, a dive into the research behind it, and my personal favorite—reflection for individuals and application for leaders. Right now everyone is hungry for “what can I do?” And “how can I make a difference?” Having these guided lessons at the end of each chapter really helps you drive home the knowledge and start making real changes for yourself and others. This is definitely worth your time if you’re an individual or leader looking to make positive change.

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  2. VB&Me

    I bought this book for a class I’m taking. However, as a manager, I found this book intriguing and insightful. I think it should be required reading for new managers. Book provides knowledge as well as practical exercises for you to do to learn about your own biases.

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  3. LIFE_COMPOSED

    I have found this book to be enlightening. I have spent years emphasizing the need for integrity in the process, yet what I realize now is that I have been really challenging individuals to move their unconscious biases to a conscious state! HIGHLY RECOMMEND this read. Pam Fuller thank you for authoring this book.

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  4. Jennifer K. Bartkowski

    This book is an excellent read for leaders and non-leaders alike. In fact, I am buying a copy for a few managers on my team as the book is engaging, easy to read and contains some valuable and real-world insight. I like the reflections at the end of each chapter to help make the reading more personal and I particularly enjoyed Mark and Anne’s sharing of actual experiences. This book connects the idea of unconscious bias to creating high performing teams in a way that makes the reader think differently about how they interact within the workplace. I got some very good tips about what I personally can do to manage my bias and what my organization can do to manage bias. Excellent read that covers a lot of ground.

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  5. Kelly Mackin

    I’ve been meaning to write a review for this book for some time! It overdelivered and I highly recommend it!

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  6. miranda

    The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias is a must read. Frankin Covey has done a great job opening the door to help you to see and overcome bias. The title leads you to believe it is a book for leaders, but it’s not. This is a book for everyone and should be on your reading list. The book walks you through the process of identifying bias and develop the courage to address bias. This book provides educational tools to help you see and understand the full spectrum of bias. Take note and make this book your daily guide to help overcome bias. Our society is full of all kinds of bias, this book is key to move forward and past the bias that hold so many back. Don’t wait to long to get your copy.

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  7. all purpose

    I thought the book did a nice job early on building the case that we all have biases and provided techniques to help us recognize and challenge them. It also pointed out that some of our biases can be helpful but we need to recognize when they could be detrimental. The book points out that we should be open with each other, welcoming of people with different perspectives /backgrounds and be willing to challenge existing norms. These are good, time honored messages but the 2nd half of the book felt like I was sitting through an HR seminar on diversity & inclusion. In my career, I’ve heard similar messages dozens of times, which is why I was disappointed much of the book didn’t break new ground like the first part did. If you follow the Golden Rule you already know much of what is covered in the meat of this book.I think this book is written to help shape the culture of an organization in a positive way through advocacy and enablement. That said some organizations thrive on their unique culture already and there weren’t many thoughts on preserving what makes a company unique and special while pushing for change in those areas that may need it.My last observation is this differs from many of Stephen Covey’s personal works in that there are no references to biblical principles. Some people may find that a good thing but I always enjoyed how he tied leadership discussions back to his faith. I know he’s no longer with us but I suspect he would be disappointed with that omission.

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  8. Angela Hummel

    This book is full of valuable information. I have so many highlights and notes. I have been in the talent development and HR field for more than 20 years, and I so appreciate when an author provides solid information and advice that can be moved quickly into action. Each chapter provides a Reflection for Individuals and Application for Leaders. There are also great questions that could be used by a leadership team to read together and then discuss, or perhaps a book club at work, too. There is so much in this book that will be helpful to leaders, trainers, individual contributors and really anyone wanting to create workplaces that are diverse, equal and inclusive. There are also great examples from the three authors throughout. I highly recommend that you add this to your reading list. And if you are in HR or talent development, put it at the top of your list!

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  9. jacobnel

    Quality on point and fast delivery

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  10. SMaddox

    One of the best books for any and all leaders. I continue to listen and re-read this. The way the authors explain each and every aspect of how leaders can impact, learn and contribute to their teams is exactly what all leaders should follow. The exercises assist with putting the author’s words into practice. I have not only continued to listen, implement and improve on my own team, but gifted this book to others as they step into positions where this can help. Thank you to all the authors.

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  11. LIFE_COMPOSED

    I have found this book to be enlightening. I have spent years emphasizing the need for integrity in the process, yet what I realize now is that I have been really challenging individuals to move their unconscious biases to a conscious state! HIGHLY RECOMMEND this read. Pam Fuller thank you for authoring this book.

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  12. jeanne erickson

    The authors provide the readers with the framework to define bias within themselves and to address it within the workplace. and elsewhere This is the perfect time for the release of this book. It is relevant to the current soietal climate. Althought the content is thought provoking and at times difficult through self reflection, it is an easy to read! The tools given are practical, and easy to apply! Put is on your reading list.. and absolute must read!

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  13. Tim Torres

    I was afraid it was going to be one of those “shame on you for being born” books…But it’s not at all like that! Instead, it explains that bias is natural and how the brain chunks information. That’s why it’s so important to be aware of our bias. It provides opportunities for great reflection, promotes self awareness, provides ways to increase connectedness, and help everyone to feel included and like they belong (including ourselves). The three authors are so real as they share examples of their own biases (conscious and unconscious) and also experiences with other people’s unconscious biases.If you’re looking for a book to hate the world with, this is not it. If you’re looking for a book that will give you tools and awareness to change the world for good, then I highly recommend reading this book!

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  14. Pamela Osborne

    The Leaders Guide to Unconscious Bias is an informative, present day look at biases while providing tools to help identify and address them. Given our current environment nationally, this book couldn’t be released at a more relevant time. Every leader, and future leader, need to read this book cover to cover!

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  15. Rick

    I have to admit that I expected this to be an SJW diatribe but was very surprised to find a lot of great information that I can use with my team to help resolve much of the tension and strife that exists within my company.I oversee service centers that repair and maintain high-end equipment for individuals and companies around the world. Two of the service centers are company-owned and four are privately owned. There is an internal bias that the non-company owned service centers do not have the same standards as the company-owned, that the European service centers are hard to work with and the technicians assume that everyone that is not a technician is just unnecessary overhead. A lot of bias. I have been working toward changing some of these attitudes but this book has given me a new set of tools to work with. My leads and I will definitely be working through this material together.The customers range from business owners that are very successful to company managers that are very difficult to work with. After going through the book I really understand how I have created biases for and against each type of customer, developing great relationships with some, and very antagonistic relationships with others.So the material in this book is relevant to anyone that has to work with others and will have biases, not just bias regarding race, gender, or ….? I work with an amazing group of people internally and externally to my company. I can use what I have learned reading this book to recognize my own biases and to recognize when I am dealing with someone who has their own bias. Going through the exercises has been extremely helpful and I will be integrating some of them into our training. Helping our team members to focus on connection/belonging and having empathy for other employees and for owners is easily worth the price of this book.This book will likely become required reading for anyone that is added to my management team.

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  16. Richard P.

    “As leaders, we have an obligation to help each of our team members develop a career as robust and rewarding as they desire it to be…” – Anne Chow, CEO of AT&T BusinessFrom the leadership experts at FranklinCovey, “The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias” is an extraordinary guide to reframing bias, cultivating connection, and creating high-performing teams. Written in a remarkably accessible and practical style, “The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias” starts with a basic truth – unconscious bias is impacting organizational performance whether we know it or not.From there, FranklinCovey chief thought leader on inclusion and bias Pamela Fuller joins co-writers Mark Murphy, a Franklin Covey senior consultant, and AT&T Business CEO Anne Chow in crafting a four-part framework to identify bias, cultivate connection, choose courage, and apply against the talent lifecycle.The end result, both applicable and inspirational, is a book that equips readers with tangible tools to create the best environment for all of their team members and to mitigate possible negative impacts of workplace bias.I wasn’t much past the preface to what I’ll start calling “Unconscious Bias,” a preface sharing that between the time the authors sent their manuscript to the editors at Simon & Schuster on May 15th, 2020 and two weeks later when they received it back for review that the world had dramatically changed as the impact of quarantine had begun to be overshadowed in powerful ways by global protests about racial injustice.While the connection between injustice and bias, especially within a corporate setting, may seem thin, the truth is they are interwoven. “Unconscious Bias” asserts that bias is, in fact, part of the human condition and how our brains work.To be human is to have bias.The power of “Unconscious Bias,” a book that challenged me in ways big and small, is that it simultaneously speaks to the corporate world while tapping into the humanity that we all bring into our roles as employees, leaders, and human beings. While speaking to organizations, “Unconscious Bias” encourages each reader to explore vulnerability, develop curiosity, and build empathy – essential choices to be made in moving past our negative biases and choosing courage.Tackling our biases does take courage.”Unconscious Bias” explores best practices and strategies applicable to the Talent Lifecycle and speaks to building high-performing teams AND high-performing individuals and creating the high-performing cultures that will foster both of these things.Yet, it was the final paragraph of the preface that really hooked me, a simple statement shared from FranklinCovey CEO Bob Whitman that “You must do the work your goals require,” words shared at a conference yet words that ultimately guide the organizational cultures we create and our work toward a more inclusive world and organization.Fuller, Chow, and Murphy have crafted an intelligent, insightful, and almost stunningly compassionate book that defines bias, explores the ways in which it helps and hurts performance, and explored tangible ways, many of them documented at the end of each remarkable chapter, we can course-correct when we become aware of unconscious bias influencing our work.As a professional with a disability, it has been rare for me to see a book addressing leadership skills that gives attention to employees, job seekers, and professional leaders with disabilities.Yet, “Unconscious Bias” does so and does so regularly throughout the book.Truthfully? I’ll even admit I cried once. Okay, actually, I think I cried and then did a fist bump in the air.The core of “Unconscious Bias” is the Bias Progress Model, a model that takes the central concepts of identifying bias, cultivating connection, and choosing courage and applies it across the Talent Lifecycle. The power of this teaching for me is found early in the book as we learn to take that lifecycle and go beyond the usual realm of law and policy. Each central concept is associated with a principle, for example “self-awareness,” and “Unconscious Bias” beautifully explores both central concept and principle and the ways they work together.In addition to the wisdom of each chapter, each chapter ends with an extended reflection for individuals along with “Application for Leaders,” both essentially practical exercises to help integrate the material more fully.”Unconscious Bias” became a book that I started with reading.Then, I read it again.Then, I re-read it again AND began working through both the reflections and applications. Truthfully? I’m still not done. Each time through “Unconscious Bias” has resulted in seeing something new and having a new “Aha!” moment come to life.The chapters make sense and flow beautifully.The first part, Identify Bias, explores identity, an understanding of neuroscience, recognizing bias trips, and embracing mindfulness.Ah, mindfulness.In the second part, Cultivating Connection, “Unconscious Bias” explores belonging, curiosity, empathy, the power of networks, and the ever important navigation of difficult conversations.Choosing Courage explores the courage to identify, cope, be an ally, and be an advocate. While, finally, the actual Talent Lifecycle explores the very real world issues of getting hired, contributing/engaging, and moving up.All of these areas are addressed in ways that are meaningful to both individuals and organizations and in ways that are inclusive and refreshingly transparent and vulnerable.If it’s not yet readily apparent, I loved “The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias,” a powerful and enlightening book both personally and professionally that is beautifully written in a way that makes it easy to read yet also in a way that will make you want to re-read it again and again and again.I would easily recommend taking the time to explore the exercises at the end of each chapter, exercises that marvelously illuminate the writing and will no doubt help integrate the material so that you’ll find, as I have, that the teaching will come to mind the next time you find yourself in a situation where you’re experiencing unconscious bias.In the short time since I read the book for the third time, I’ve seen myself applying these lessons as an employee and as a leader and there’s no doubt this will continue as I work to have the courage to understand bias’s role in my life and what I can do about it.

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  17. Laura DurantLaura Durant

    As a self-help fan, all-out nerd, and possible masochist, I looked forward to reading this guide. In truth, I will read anything by the leadership factory that is Franklin Covey. My copy of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People contains an embarrassing number of exclamation points and self musings in its margins. Still, this book exceeded my expectations.The Leader’s Guide To Unconscious Bias is uncanny in its prescience, published at the hour when we need this kind of information the most. Simply put, you don’t know what you don’t know. After living through the upheavals of 2020 and witnessing the havoc biases wreaked on marginalized populations, this guide is a welcome road map to brighter, better days ahead. Pamela Fuller, Mark Murphy, and Anne Chow pull no punches from the get-go. From the preface:Injustice is the ultimate limitation and does real harm to those directly and indirectly affected by it.Asking readers to do a deep mental dive and acknowledge our biases during a time of global unrest is no small feat, but this trio of leadership gurus makes it surprisingly digestible. The guide is divided into four sections: Identify Bias, Cultivate Connection, Choose Courage, and Apply Across the Talent Lifecycle. Each section contains an assortment of engaging textual information, graphics, personal accounts, and worksheets. All the bases are covered here, even the ones you didn’t know needed covering (which is kind of the point of this book).It’s refreshing to see Fuller, Murphy, and Chow celebrate choosing courage over inaction and arming leaders with the tools to do so. We need more of this. The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias is a must-read.

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  18. Zach

    What a tremendous book. The authors, Pamela, Mark, and Anne find a great balance in this book to discuss why reframing bias is essential for today’s work environment. The stories are relevant and vulnerable. The exercises at the end of each chapter actually help. I’m so excited to spread the word about this book.

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  19. Amazon Customer

    I really enjoyed this book. It was interesting, well-written, and easy to read. The subject matter was insightful and pertinent to today’s times. Highly recommend!

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  20. Cara H.

    The engaging style makes this book more like a conversation with a close friend than reading a text book. The authors make the case that most bias is unintentional, not malicious and effects each of us. The personal stories and practical, no guilt advice is applicable to more than just business leaders. Team leads, mentors, parents and anyone who aspires to lead by example can make their relationships and teams their best by helping each person achieve their best. Each of us has a role by challenging our own internal biases and being an advocate for others. As a mentor for a high school team, I found a lot of applicable advice to help engage our students. I found this book so useful and easy to read, I’ve purchased copies for my college age children.

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  21. Jennifer V

    “In our framework, identifying bias helps us make progress at the individual level. Cultivating meaningful connection helps us make progress at the interpersonal level. And choosing courage helps us make progress on bias at all levels.”The authors did a great job in the style of writing, making it an engaging and progressive journey. From clearly defining bias, how it affects performance and the importance specific to leaders, teams and organizations. Well written and thought provoking, with the many gems of information to the tools provided to allow opportunity for Reflection and Application at the end of each chapter. This really allowed opportunity to pause, take time to reflect and digest to the points outlined in each section. The real-world examples really help to take away actionable/tangible scenarios vs theoretical ideas.“To be human is to have bias.” The authors did an incredible job of taking a topic that may be uncomfortable for some to discuss and found ways to make it tangible and relatable. Facing this fact and understanding our part in bias takes reflection and courage. This book helps navigate that process, providing a deep dive into various aspects of bias, how to approach and how to reframe our thought process and awareness. This is a must for all team members to strengthen teams and organizations alike.I highly recommend this book! I will be re-reading this book to pick up additional insights and because bias is a journey we must continue to navigate.

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  22. Jill Montanez

    This is an easy to read, cant put down, comprehensive book on unconscious bias, what it is, and what it is not. I especially like the application sections in the back of each chapter that gives practical ways to apply the knowledge. A must read for everyone!

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  23. Amber K Bauer

    Fantastic book. Great insight and perspective. Love the “workbook” aspect to really allow yourself to reflect. Highly recommended!!

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  24. VB&Me

    I bought this book for a class I’m taking. However, as a manager, I found this book intriguing and insightful. I think it should be required reading for new managers. Book provides knowledge as well as practical exercises for you to do to learn about your own biases.

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  25. Angela Hummel

    This book is full of valuable information. I have so many highlights and notes. I have been in the talent development and HR field for more than 20 years, and I so appreciate when an author provides solid information and advice that can be moved quickly into action. Each chapter provides a Reflection for Individuals and Application for Leaders. There are also great questions that could be used by a leadership team to read together and then discuss, or perhaps a book club at work, too. There is so much in this book that will be helpful to leaders, trainers, individual contributors and really anyone wanting to create workplaces that are diverse, equal and inclusive. There are also great examples from the three authors throughout. I highly recommend that you add this to your reading list. And if you are in HR or talent development, put it at the top of your list!

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  26. Ruby

    Informative, practical and relevant

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  27. jacobnel

    Quality on point and fast delivery

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  28. Pipitobuenaondas

    Interesante Para su lectura.

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  29. Robert Morris

    Although Pamela Fuller, and Mark Murphy with Anne Chow are the co-authors of this book, its lively and eloquent narrative is provided by Fuller on their behalf. As they explain, “This book is our contribution to help advance a more inclusive world, where we can name and take responsibility for our own biases, use empathy and curiosity to more effectively connect with others, and choose courage to make positive changes at work. Discrimination, racial injustice, and injustice in any form…have no place in society or in the workplace.”They go on to point out, “What follows is a framework for leaders at all levels to enhance performance in themselves, their teams, and their organizations by understanding the nature of bias. In this book, we encourage each person to explore vulnerability, develop curiosity, and build empathy to move past negative biases and choose courage — all while applying best practices, strategies, and tactics to the Talent Lifecycle.”Fuller, Murphy, and Chow “unpack and explore the Bias Progress Model” throughout the book and carefully organize their material within four Parts. First, they explain how to identify bias by understanding the neuroscience which also helps their reader to recognize the bias traps and to embrace mindfulness.Next, they shift their and their reader’s attention to focusing on belonging by deploying curiosity and empathy that tap into the power of networks, especially when navigating difficult conversations. Then in Part 3, they share their thoughts (and feelings) about the courage needed to identify biases and their traps, to cope with those who are hostage to their unconscious biases, to support those who share their commitment to the elimination of those biases that have a significant [begin italics] negative [end italics] impact, and to be an advocate (if not an evangelist) of that process of unconscious bias identification, examination, and elimination.Finally, having already introduced and examined the Bias Progress Model and the Talent Lifecycle, Fuller, Murphy, and Chow share their thoughts (and suggestions) with regard to the process of recruiting, interviewing, and hiring the talent needed;then using strategies for onboarding, engaging, and retaining those hires; then in Chapter 16, they focus on performance management that accelerates employees’ personal growth and professional developmentAs you may already know, Joseph Luft and Harrington Ingham introduced their concept of “the unknown unknowns” in 1955. That is, ignorance of one’s ignorance. This is is probably what Mark Twain had in mind when observing, ” It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” Yes, it is very important to recognize what our specific knowledge needs are, relevant to the given situation. Ignorance of unknown unknowns can result in bad decisions and the worst of these can do serious damage.Presumably Pamela Fuller, Mark Murphy, and Anne Chow agree with me that unconscious bias [begin italics] with negative impact [end italics] is among the most destructive of unknown unknowns. It can corrupt — perhaps even destroy — almost any organization, whatever its size and nature may be. It can also severely damage an individual’s self-esteem in ways and to an extent that are not necessarily obvious.How to reduce it and eventually eliminate it? Read this book and become fully aware of your own subconscious biases, then manage (if not eliminate) them so that you can then help others to do so. I presume to suggest one final point of emphasis, provided by Eleanor Roosevelt: “No one can make you feel inferior without your permission.”

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  30. Rachel Simon

    This was a very insightful book about such an important topic. I took away many tips and resources – I especially liked the ending of each chapter that had “reflections for individuals” and “applications for leaders.” I also appreciated the different perspectives from the three unique authors and found applicability in all of them.

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  31. Cara H.

    The engaging style makes this book more like a conversation with a close friend than reading a text book. The authors make the case that most bias is unintentional, not malicious and effects each of us. The personal stories and practical, no guilt advice is applicable to more than just business leaders. Team leads, mentors, parents and anyone who aspires to lead by example can make their relationships and teams their best by helping each person achieve their best. Each of us has a role by challenging our own internal biases and being an advocate for others. As a mentor for a high school team, I found a lot of applicable advice to help engage our students. I found this book so useful and easy to read, I’ve purchased copies for my college age children.

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  32. Chanta

    Anne, Pamela and Mark do an amazing job breaking down the layers of unconscious biases we face as leaders everyday. The simple and direct messaging used throughout the book is very helpful to me as a growing leader. With this book, I am now learning to navigate my unconscious biases and how to reframe my thought process so I can become a better leader especially with next generations known as Gen Z and Gen Alpha entering the workforce. The book have great insight that can help leaders at all levels. Thank you three for a different perspective of how we can level up as leaders in times where diversity and inclusion is needed more than ever.

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  33. Brandon

    Everyone has bias… period! The question is, what are you doing about it? Pamela Fuller, Mark Murphy, and Anne Chow have done an amazing job opening up the discussion of bias and helping their readers identify their own biases as well as those displayed all around us. At such a critical point in history, when bias is beginning to be recognized more openly and called out, this book not only discusses some of the types of bias we may encounter, but it gives ideas of how to talk about that bias in a productive manner where all parties can learn and grow. From the perspective of leadership, this book provides a whole host of tools that can be employed to recognize when bias may be coming into play and mitigate its effects within your organizations. With everything from data driven perspectives to anecdotes and case studies, this is the perfect book for every leader to begin learning about, recognizing, and doing something about biases. This will be a perennial read for me!

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  34. Randy

    “The good news is that our brains are wired not just for biases and preferences but also for change and growth.” This statement in the introduction captures the authors’ approach of creating understanding of our biases and also, importantly, providing practical frameworks, tools and myriad examples that bring to life how each of us can grow and change for the better. I found the use of the unique voices of each of the authors very powerful and relatable. One of the things that has been most impactful in my workplace when it comes to DEI, is when people have shared their stories. This book is full of the kind of stories that cause people to see things differently, to think differently, to have empathy and ultimately to take different actions. Highly recommended for anyone who cares about what they can do to take their professional interactions, relationships and performance to a higher level.

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  35. Zach

    What a tremendous book. The authors, Pamela, Mark, and Anne find a great balance in this book to discuss why reframing bias is essential for today’s work environment. The stories are relevant and vulnerable. The exercises at the end of each chapter actually help. I’m so excited to spread the word about this book.

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  36. GHF

    I received a complimentary copy of this book because I volunteered to be a part of the book launch team. The book started out slow for me. I didn’t feel a connection with the primary author’s voice initially. Moreover, I was concerned that it would be a big commercial for Franklin Covey’s consulting services. However, I kept reading and was pleasantly surprised. Now that our country has a heightened awareness of the value of multicultural audiences, diversity and inclusion has become top of mind again. What makes this book a great universal resource on unconscious bias and a must read for those interested in D&I is found at the end of each chapter. First, there are personal anecdotes and experiences relating back to the chapter by the two sub-authors. Written in the first person, I felt like they were talking to me directly. Another plus of the book are the exercises and tools at the end of each chapter. Realizing that every reader may not work in a traditional corporate setting, the authors smartly created two sets of exercises: one set for corporate leaders and another for individuals. These useful exercises helped to reinforce the messaging/key learnings in each chapter.

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  37. Daniel H. Marshall

    It is very true that Unconscious bias affects everyone. I didn’t really clearly understand this until seeing this through the eyes of the authors. We all have various different experiences and we often overlook the bias we all have and work to justify them. This book provides a framework for understanding our personal likes and dislikes and how it affects organizational and personal behavior. We often think that once in the workplace we all perceive a situation as the same and our personal histories and experiences are congruent.This book helps shed light on how to change your paradigm and improve your perspective as a leader. I think the solutions offered in this well written situational book should be a foundational ready for any organization leader or manager. I sincerely hope they turn this into a course. Do yourself a favor and read this book it will help with adapting to changing perspectives and make you a better leader!

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  38. L

    This book is very insightful for our day and age.It really highlights that bias is not always intentional and how to approach dealing with the unconscious aspect of our daily interactions.Highly recommended for anyone who wants to improve professional environment as well as personal.

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  39. McWilliams

    Recommended 10fold! Such a well written and thought provoking guide on reframing bias, connecting better with not only those around you but as a leader! You will not only find yourself cultivating a new way of thinking but learn how to create a high performing team. It has already helped me develop as a leader and strengthened my mentoring skills by providing thought provoking dialog on the unconscious bias we have daily. It challenges you to think about even our self limiting bias and how your brain creates bias.If your looking for tools on how to navigate difficult conversations as a leader, to be proactive and not be passive in your unbiased approach to discussions, this IS the book to grab! When you do, I strongly suggest to explore the exercises throughout the book. It’s eyes opening! No doubt that we are in a world that if we all took the time to work on our unconscious bias, we would be in a better place as a whole. Complete revenant and applicable in the ever changing world we live in.

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  40. Jennifer V

    “In our framework, identifying bias helps us make progress at the individual level. Cultivating meaningful connection helps us make progress at the interpersonal level. And choosing courage helps us make progress on bias at all levels.”The authors did a great job in the style of writing, making it an engaging and progressive journey. From clearly defining bias, how it affects performance and the importance specific to leaders, teams and organizations. Well written and thought provoking, with the many gems of information to the tools provided to allow opportunity for Reflection and Application at the end of each chapter. This really allowed opportunity to pause, take time to reflect and digest to the points outlined in each section. The real-world examples really help to take away actionable/tangible scenarios vs theoretical ideas.“To be human is to have bias.” The authors did an incredible job of taking a topic that may be uncomfortable for some to discuss and found ways to make it tangible and relatable. Facing this fact and understanding our part in bias takes reflection and courage. This book helps navigate that process, providing a deep dive into various aspects of bias, how to approach and how to reframe our thought process and awareness. This is a must for all team members to strengthen teams and organizations alike.I highly recommend this book! I will be re-reading this book to pick up additional insights and because bias is a journey we must continue to navigate.

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  41. Dan Miklovic

    The book (a pre-release copy) contains a lot of guidance on how to identify unconscious bias both at the individual level and at the organizational level. The examples hit home too often as we all suffer from bias. The book helps you understand how you can recognize biases you have and what you can do to minimize them and the damage they do. It is an easy read in the sense it flows well and has numerous tools to help you think about the topic. What I found it lacked were stronger tools to help you facilitate cultural change if you are at the bottom of the hierarchy. The “lead by example” advice only goes so far.That said, it should be mandatory reading for every manager, executive, and especially politician.

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  42. Pamela Osborne

    The Leaders Guide to Unconscious Bias is an informative, present day look at biases while providing tools to help identify and address them. Given our current environment nationally, this book couldn’t be released at a more relevant time. Every leader, and future leader, need to read this book cover to cover!

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  43. Rachel Simon

    This was a very insightful book about such an important topic. I took away many tips and resources – I especially liked the ending of each chapter that had “reflections for individuals” and “applications for leaders.” I also appreciated the different perspectives from the three unique authors and found applicability in all of them.

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  44. E010

    This is an enlighten book for any leader both professionally and personally!We all have “Unconscious Bias” and this book not only show you to how to recognize them, but also how to reflect on them, then help you be mindful and strategically apply daily!

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    The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias: How To Reframe Bias, Cultivate Connection, and Create High-Performing Teams
    The Leader’s Guide to Unconscious Bias: How To Reframe Bias, Cultivate Connection, and Create High-Performing Teams

    $12.99

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