Radical Inclusion: Seven Steps to Help You Create a More Just Workplace, Home, and World

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BEST BOOKS OUT THIS WEEK, KIRKUS CRITIC’S PICKS

“Utilizing tales and examples, David Moinina Sengeh presents seven rules for radical inclusion which can be AS ACTIONABLE AS THEY ARE POWERFUL.” ―Brené Brown

This ebook is a grasp class in innovation and human transformation.” ―Kwame Alexander

Are you able to think about a world the place everybody belongs?

Readers who’ve encountered this extraordinary ebook after seeing it featured on the At the moment Present and at packed occasions throughout the nation are discovering that Radical Inclusion is in contrast to any ebook they’ve ever learn earlier than – and is the ebook all of us most want now. David Moinina Sengeh has written a page-turning and deeply human story that offers a exceptional blueprint we will apply to our every day lives.

Inspiring, shifting, and sometimes humorous, the ebook contains fantastic tales and anecdotes that present us particular methods to make our houses, workplaces, and communities happier and extra simply locations for everybody. Sengeh takes us with him on his personal exceptional journey as he learns learn how to:

1. Establish the exclusion
2. Pay attention, to grasp and be taught
3. Outline your function – why you, why now?
4. Construct a coalition
5. Pursue advocacy and motion
6. Adapt to a brand new regular
7. See past inclusion

Get able to be impressed by David Moinina Sengeh and his imaginative and prescient for Radical Inclusion. In a profession spanning the globe, he has empowered women by way of common schooling and advocacy. Now YOU can be taught from his experiences by way of his ebook, Radical Inclusion, the primary launch from Second of Carry Books, created by Melinda French Gates.

Specification: Radical Inclusion: Seven Steps to Help You Create a More Just Workplace, Home, and World

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12 reviews for Radical Inclusion: Seven Steps to Help You Create a More Just Workplace, Home, and World

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  1. ebun

    My first point is don’t get one copy, get at least 2! Next would be, don’t read it once, read it at least twice! As I go into these pages again (but this time with my pencil and highlighter) be aware that this book would transport you into the classroom of your favorite teacher who would simplify the most complicated of concepts and above all make you believe and become a remarkable student . This book is a meal- best enjoyed shared with someone you love.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  2. Mustapha B Turay

    I know the author very well. He is a brilliant young man. If individuals and institutions follow the ideas and theories enumerated in this book, the world would be a better place. A good read!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  3. Delordson Moinina Kallon Jr

    I’ve had the privilege of serving on inclusion boards. Most organisations have them and they all have laudable goals but not always the toolkit to deliver on those goals. This book provides that missing toolkit. The book uses the real life example of how the author, the minister of basic and senior secondary education in Sierra Leone, with the support and leadership of the President of Sierra Leone, set about delivering ‘Radical Inclusion’ in education for girls. Coming from a scientific background, I greatly appreciated the data driven approach outlined in the seven steps. I appreciated even more the many references to sources for further reading. I made liberal use of the Kindle highlighting tool!Unfortunately, in some sectors of society diversity and inclusion has become a pejorative term. This book tells us why inclusion matters. When the excluded and are brought in, it benefits not just them but also the excluders as well. I can’t recommend this book highly enough.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  4. Lauren

    Set in Sierra Leone, radical inclusion is universally needed, applicable and appreciated. Beautifully written and accessible. This book is recommended to everyone who wants change, transformation and to challenge the status quo.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  5. Scott J Pearson

    David Moinina Sengeh was seemingly at the peak of a great career triumph. Educated in America at Harvard and MIT, he was now a governmental cabinet member of education in his home country Sierra Leone. However, at the very beginning of his president’s term, the president – his boss – said that he would maintain the previous regime’s policy of banning pregnant girls from school. To most, this move seemed to make sense. However, to Sengeh, it did not, and he considered resigning. A ban makes an already hard situation worse. Many of the girls had experienced domestic rape, so a ban would keep them permanently from becoming productive citizens. So Sengeh’s sense of calling was excited, and this book’s real-life plot was begun.Of course, many experience a moving sense of calling; few maintain it to execution. This story, more of an inspirational memoir than anything else, tells how he organized his own mind, then his own government, and then his country to implement the idea of “radical inclusion” that animated his passion. He changed the president’s mind and the country’s hearts. He did so in a very brainy way and used wide learning to tear down social, religious, and ethnic barriers.Many pursue education in the hope of changing the world. Certainly, Sengeh did by pursuing a PhD in biomedical engineering. Yet maintaining momentum to adopt changes, even if they’re different from the ones you started with, is an arduous task. Sengeh’s words can inspire people by training their hearts and minds to fulfill their dreams and make a difference in the fate of humanity. His story is a good lesson in intense, focused work.This book is short but power-packed. It enlightens because it did not occur in a “developed” country but rather mostly in western Africa. It provokes hope because Sengeh taught an entire nation one powerful principle: what he calls “radical inclusion.” It teaches us how to apply such powerful lessons in our lives. Its only shortcoming, which is minor in the book’s scope but common among politicians, is that his ego sometimes pedantically stalls in communicating the essential storyline. Overall, though, he conveys his tale with passion, brilliance, and force.This book can garner a global audience, particularly those of us whose jobs it is to implement change. It inspires and instructs at the same time. It can also propel students forward to seeing their transformative visions of the future put into effect. He avoids hyperbole and fluffiness that is too common in heartwarming tales. The fact that this impact was achieved by an African, albeit with a privileged education, shows that any world citizen can institute meaningful impact.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  6. Lauren

    Set in Sierra Leone, radical inclusion is universally needed, applicable and appreciated. Beautifully written and accessible. This book is recommended to everyone who wants change, transformation and to challenge the status quo.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  7. Delordson Moinina Kallon Jr

    I’ve had the privilege of serving on inclusion boards. Most organisations have them and they all have laudable goals but not always the toolkit to deliver on those goals. This book provides that missing toolkit. The book uses the real life example of how the author, the minister of basic and senior secondary education in Sierra Leone, with the support and leadership of the President of Sierra Leone, set about delivering ‘Radical Inclusion’ in education for girls. Coming from a scientific background, I greatly appreciated the data driven approach outlined in the seven steps. I appreciated even more the many references to sources for further reading. I made liberal use of the Kindle highlighting tool!Unfortunately, in some sectors of society diversity and inclusion has become a pejorative term. This book tells us why inclusion matters. When the excluded and are brought in, it benefits not just them but also the excluders as well. I can’t recommend this book highly enough.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  8. Mustapha B Turay

    I know the author very well. He is a brilliant young man. If individuals and institutions follow the ideas and theories enumerated in this book, the world would be a better place. A good read!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  9. ebun

    My first point is don’t get one copy, get at least 2! Next would be, don’t read it once, read it at least twice! As I go into these pages again (but this time with my pencil and highlighter) be aware that this book would transport you into the classroom of your favorite teacher who would simplify the most complicated of concepts and above all make you believe and become a remarkable student . This book is a meal- best enjoyed shared with someone you love.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  10. Scott J Pearson

    David Moinina Sengeh was seemingly at the peak of a great career triumph. Educated in America at Harvard and MIT, he was now a governmental cabinet member of education in his home country Sierra Leone. However, at the very beginning of his president’s term, the president – his boss – said that he would maintain the previous regime’s policy of banning pregnant girls from school. To most, this move seemed to make sense. However, to Sengeh, it did not, and he considered resigning. A ban makes an already hard situation worse. Many of the girls had experienced domestic rape, so a ban would keep them permanently from becoming productive citizens. So Sengeh’s sense of calling was excited, and this book’s real-life plot was begun.Of course, many experience a moving sense of calling; few maintain it to execution. This story, more of an inspirational memoir than anything else, tells how he organized his own mind, then his own government, and then his country to implement the idea of “radical inclusion” that animated his passion. He changed the president’s mind and the country’s hearts. He did so in a very brainy way and used wide learning to tear down social, religious, and ethnic barriers.Many pursue education in the hope of changing the world. Certainly, Sengeh did by pursuing a PhD in biomedical engineering. Yet maintaining momentum to adopt changes, even if they’re different from the ones you started with, is an arduous task. Sengeh’s words can inspire people by training their hearts and minds to fulfill their dreams and make a difference in the fate of humanity. His story is a good lesson in intense, focused work.This book is short but power-packed. It enlightens because it did not occur in a “developed” country but rather mostly in western Africa. It provokes hope because Sengeh taught an entire nation one powerful principle: what he calls “radical inclusion.” It teaches us how to apply such powerful lessons in our lives. Its only shortcoming, which is minor in the book’s scope but common among politicians, is that his ego sometimes pedantically stalls in communicating the essential storyline. Overall, though, he conveys his tale with passion, brilliance, and force.This book can garner a global audience, particularly those of us whose jobs it is to implement change. It inspires and instructs at the same time. It can also propel students forward to seeing their transformative visions of the future put into effect. He avoids hyperbole and fluffiness that is too common in heartwarming tales. The fact that this impact was achieved by an African, albeit with a privileged education, shows that any world citizen can institute meaningful impact.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  11. Kathryn Witzel

    David Moinina Sengeh comes to the issue of Radical Inclusion with all of the credentials: education, experience, government position. The heart of this book on social Justice is a primer on addressing systemic issues within a culture. He uses examples from his life of advocating for pregnant students to stay. in school in Sierra Leone. As Minister of Education, he felt passionately about continuing education to allow women to succeed. He spells out the seven essential steps for creating an inclusive society that can be transferred to other situations. The reader must keep an open mind throughout the first portion of the book to get to the applicable steps. Important work for people who feel like there is no hope for change.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  12. Kathryn Witzel

    David Moinina Sengeh comes to the issue of Radical Inclusion with all of the credentials: education, experience, government position. The heart of this book on social Justice is a primer on addressing systemic issues within a culture. He uses examples from his life of advocating for pregnant students to stay. in school in Sierra Leone. As Minister of Education, he felt passionately about continuing education to allow women to succeed. He spells out the seven essential steps for creating an inclusive society that can be transferred to other situations. The reader must keep an open mind throughout the first portion of the book to get to the applicable steps. Important work for people who feel like there is no hope for change.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this

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    Radical Inclusion: Seven Steps to Help You Create a More Just Workplace, Home, and World
    Radical Inclusion: Seven Steps to Help You Create a More Just Workplace, Home, and World

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