Free At Last: Civil Rights Heroes [DVD]

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The civil rights motion in america is often understood when it comes to its management, resembling Martin Luther King, Jr., or its dramatic occasions just like the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. However usually the catalysts for progress had been individuals who fought from inside a bigger group or carried out particular person, seemingly small acts or heroism – some even victims who occurred to be within the improper place on the improper time. Now see these tales of these whose fates stirred the nation and solid a tremendous new path. The unbelievable tales of Emmett Until, Medgar Evers, The Birmingham 4, Viola Liuzzo, Jimmy Lee Jackson, Rev. James Reeb and extra!

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6 reviews for Free At Last: Civil Rights Heroes [DVD]

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  1. Alfred Johnson

    Every major (and most minor) progressive social struggle in America from the struggle for independence from Great Britain through to the struggle for slavery abolition up to the struggle for women’s rights and gender equality today has had more than its share of heroes and martyrs. The purpose of the documentary under review, Free At Last: Civil Rights Heroes, rightly, highlights some of those lesser known heroes and martyrs from the struggle for black civil rights that came to national prominence in the1950s and 1960s (although arguably that conscious struggle goes back to the 1930s and before).Although, in the end the question of black equality had to be addressed (and still has to be addressed) nationally the thrust of the black civil rights movement that is featured in this film is the struggle for something like a democratic revolution by blacks and their supporters in the police state-like American South. That barbaric de jure and de facto Jim Crow system officially, as a matter state and social policy, held blacks in second class citizenship (or lower). The struggle to overcome that ingrained (and profitable, profitable for whites of almost all social strata) was almost, of necessity, going to create more than it share of heroes and martyrs.The case of fourteen year old Chicago resident Emmett Till and his horrible murder at the hands of white marauders in Mississippi in 1955, the first of the three separate segments that make up the film graphically highlights the problem. For the mere allegation of “whistling at a white woman while black” (if that allegation had any substance) young Emmett was brutally mangled and thrown into the local river. When his mother, righteously, made a cause out of this bestial murder all hell broke loose, at least on the surface. And the case galvanized blacks and whites nationally, alerting many for the first time to the hard fact that something was desperately wrong down in Mississippi (and not just there). But justice, Mississippi justice, to paraphrase poet Langston Hughes, is justice deferred. As detailed in almost all the cases highlighted in the film those directly responsible for the actions against the civil rights workers were either never brought to justice or only after something like a long drawn out legal civil war. No one should forget that aspect of the struggle either.The other cases highlighted from the assassinated Medgar Evers to the four Birmingham girls murdered in their church when it was bombed to the three civil rights workers slain in Philadelphia, Mississippi that drew nation-wide attention to slain white civil rights workers Viola Liuzzo and Reverend James Reeb, murdered for “being white while working for black civil rights” exhibit those same kinds of sickening results. Let me put it this way after viewing the film footage here, especially Bull Connor’s attack dogs being let loose on civil rights demonstrators in the streets of Birmingham, Alabama that was one of the first visual images that drove me into the civil rights struggle, I still wanted to throw something at the screen. And you wonder why fifty or so years later I still say Mississippi (or fill in your preferred state) goddam. Kudos here.

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  2. exacto67

    3 videocassettes. Part 1: Emmett Till, Medgar Evers. Part 2: The Birmingham Four, Schwerner, Chaney and Goodman; Part 3: Viola Liuzzo, Rev. James Reeb, Jimmy Lee Jackson, Vernon Dahmer.

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  3. MICHAEL KEENON

    Satisfied customer

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  4. Melody Huckaby

    This video has always been a go-to for me for my intro to American Federal Government classes or Civil Rights classes. I repurchased it when my first one became so scratched it would not play.

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  5. C. Smith

    This was a hard documentary to watch, as difficult as those that I have on Emmett Till, but I managed. I had read about some of these people – Viola Liuzzo being one of them – but to see their stories here, it just made my blood boil that people can hate so much that they willingly kill and live their lives without a care in the world. It’s tragic and all of this American hate is one reason I am not a patriot, I just cannot be as a Black woman in the USA. White people may not understand it, but I am sure that those who lost their lives trying to give my people freedom would commiserate. It can be hard too, not to retaliate or loathe in return, but I try to be friendly to everybody, and I remind myself not to fall prey to such an illness as racial hatred. I hope these martyrs are able to rest in peace, wherever they may be.

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  6. Loretta Nickerson

    Really nicely done segmented historical DVD. Some of the footage is really disturbingly graphic. That being said, it is history displayed as it actually happened, which is as it should be. Also, some of the less prominent civil rights leaders are portrayed in the DVD. The segments allow the viewer to choose hour long viewings. I think this would be helpful, especially for history teachers and other educators who teach this content. Overall this is excellent!

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    Free At Last: Civil Rights Heroes [DVD]
    Free At Last: Civil Rights Heroes [DVD]

    $19.82

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